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Stormcnter



   StormCnter posted on Nostalgia  When I was in elementary school in a small Texas town, an older lady went from school to school giving weekly private lessons in "Expression". The lessons weren't part of the school curriculum, so parents paid for them. My mother loved the idea and gladly forked over the five dollars per week. The idea was that we learned a bit of lift to our speech. When I was in sixth grade, part of my school assignment was to read aloud to the first graders so the beleaguered and overworked first grade teacher could have a break. She told me she could always tell which kids had had Expression lessons. Was this unique to Texas? Unique to our little town? Has anyone else ever had Expression lessons?
Yesterday at 10:13 EST .

   2 people like this.



   MeiDei  One thing NYers are noted for is expressive rapid fire speech, if you wanted to be heard you had to "express yourself" - does make for good reading aloud vs. monotone. No, what we had were elocution drills to rid us of our NY accent! Cawfee (coffee ), dawg (dog ) bawl (ball ) were unacceptable to our 7th grade English teacher; I still remember the drills (fat,fan, cat,can, mat, man )etc. Her concern for us was the future in radio and TV where a regional accent would not get you very far or even in the door. The lady who went from school to school and our teacher had something in common ... they cared for the whole child.

I think what you had is great, & reading to kids should be full of expression else they can get impatient or bored. Adults also respond to an expressive presentation, nothing worse than required attendance at a seminar & the speaker is monotone (the only one to get away with that is Steven Wright the comedian ). Expression gives life to the subject - your mother was a wise lady. Anyone else?
17 hours ago .


   MeiDei  Here's a link to the govt. trying to get southerners to speak differently (I object, I love accents ) the comments after are funny, love the expressive sayings, etc.
http://theconservativetreehouse.com/2014
/07/30/oak-ridge-national-lab-cancels-so
uthern-accent-reduction-training-ie-re-e
ducation-camps-to-get-southern-workers-t
o-sound-like-northeast-liberals/#more-86
375
3 hours ago .




   StormCnter posted on Suggested Reading  Are any of you familiar with Michael Koryta? Somehow I have missed his books and he's had a couple of bestselling thrillers. I'm almost finished with "Those Who Wish Me Dead" and it's a gripper. I'l going to look up some of his other work.
Tuesday at 09:47 EST .

   5 people like this.



   MeiDei  I had his book The Prophet IIRC in hand and put it back in favor of two other books by Michener. Koryta is highly regarded by Stephen King & Dean Koontz. After reading several of their books I was left to wonder: what kind of minds do they have to come up with their stories? : ) I'll slip back to the store to see if they still have his book.
Yesterday at 00:34 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter posted on Suggested Reading  I'm almost finished with "Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune" by Dedman & Newell. Huguette Clark lived a mostly reclusive life, dying fairly recently. The story is almost fairy-talish, with such enormous sums of money being spent so profligately. I recommend it. It's quick reading and gives a view into a life most of us would never be in contact with.
July 25 at 06:55 EST .

   8 people like this.



   MeiDei  Your write up was so intriguing I went to the following website: http://www.emptymansionsbook.com/ - where you can read a bit more, tour her homes/apt., etc. Fascinating.
July 25 at 10:06 EST .

  9 people like this.



   StormCnter  Thanks! I'm off to visit and marvel.
July 25 at 14:00 EST .

  10 people like this.



   Mike PHX  Thanks, Storms. You've basically supplied my summer reading list. I'm just finishing "Manson" by Jeff Guinn, about to start "Go Down Together" by same. Now this will have to be on deck. The family that gave the name to the county that Vegas is in and the accumulation and profligacy connected to it? Gimme!
July 26 at 07:59 EST .

  9 people like this.



   StormCnter  [curtsey]

I'm working on my book order list today. It's a long one.
July 26 at 11:22 EST .

  7 people like this.





   StormCnter posted on Pet Peeves  Cashiers who not only cannot perform simple math, but apparently cannot read either. Yesterday, a fiftyish cashier at Walgreens actually argued with me about the 12 cents I was owed. I had given her 22 dollars for a 21.88 purchase. She insisted I still owed her twelve cents, not understanding that her register was telling her there was 12 cents in change. Yes, I finally rolled my eyes.
July 22 at 12:02 EST .

   3 people like this.



   Rake King  AS poorly prepared for math as we see workers today, can you imagine them being a cashier in the old days, without the newer registers that tell them the change due? The new registers, along with bar coding, should make these jobs bullet proof....until StormCntr visited Walgreens. Good "peeve"
July 24 at 11:16 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Balogreene  I liked the olden days when the cashier placed the money in your hand, counting up from the amount owed to the amount paid. (and didn't put the bills in your hand with the change balanced on top! )
July 25 at 00:19 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Rake King  Balo: I used that as the only method available when I worked retail at a movie theatre and later at a phonograph record/music store. In those days also one compartment in the register was for "mills" caused by state sales tax requirements. Till they went plastic, the bus/streetcar drivers went nuts when they jammed the fare boxes. Ah yes, one of those golden memories of years gone by.
July 25 at 11:27 EST .

  3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  A local convenience store here has a cash register that tells the cashier how many of each coin and paper bill to give back as change. I have rules for giving change back....all the paper money MUST face the same direction and all change is counted back, starting with the coin. I look the customer in the eye and say "Thank You"!
July 25 at 15:27 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Bettijo  I had some copying done at a print shop. The total was an even $4.50. I handed the young man who waited on me a $10 bill. He got a calculator out of a drawer to figure how much change to give me! As a former teacher, I can remember when we did not allow calculators. That was before we started requiring them. No wonder young people never learned their math facts.

Hay, Rake, I remember sales tax tokens too.

Balo, I hate having my change handed to me like that. It takes longer to put it away and holds up the line as well as being an inconvenience to me.
July 26 at 07:19 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Balogreene  It always happens at drive-up windows, the change falls to the ground, or the floor of the car, drives me insane.
July 26 at 12:51 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  Just wait... A lot of my students in the last year or so can't use a clock with hands. Or divide by 10. Or... Well, we are in trouble! And I am supposed to teach these kids chemistry and physics. And they will vote in the next year or so.
July 26 at 20:33 EST .

  4 people like this.



   StormCnter  My husband hates carrying change around, so he tries to get rid of it when he makes a purchase. It's almost cruel to watch one of the unprepared to try to figure out (1 ) what he's doing and, (2 ) how to calculate it. For instance, he may make a purchase of 4.76, so he will give the cashier a five dollar bill and .76 in change. His objective is to get a dollar bill back. I think he's nuts and the cashiers do, too.
July 27 at 10:09 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Safetydude  10-4 on nuts.
This is from me, the guy standing in line behind your husband while he counts out his change.
Suggest to hubby that he gets a change jar and drop all his change in it at the end of the day. Once a year count the change.
You'd be suprised...
July 27 at 17:32 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Linder  I'm ok with counting out change. I only wish I were that organized.
July 28 at 09:28 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter posted on Music  A 1942 movie short: Harry James, Trumpet Serenade. It's almost 15 minutes long, but fun, fun to hear and watch.





July 20 at 12:10 EST .

   3 people like this.




   StormCnter posted on Gardening & Landscaping  Two things. I had planted 8 pittosporum, 4 on each side of the front sidewalk, a couple of months ago. The four on the south side get afternoon shade and are thriving, with new growth and healthy, perky foliage. The 4 on the north side of the sidewalk, just a dozen feet away, get full sun all day and are having trouble. Extra irrigation and a bit of fertilizer haven't helped at all. They look wilted and sick. Lo and behold, Texas got several days of the "polar vortex", with rain and much cooler temperatures. Those four pittosporum have sprung to life. They're not as large as the others on the south, but they are plenty lively. I'm loving it.

Second thing: I have a very large Brown Turkey fig tree on the southwest corner of this house. It extends well over the roof and bears two crops of figs each year. Right now, it is loaded with figs about a week away from full ripeness. My former habit was to stroll around the yard, plucking sun-warmed figs from the tree for munching. That was until last year when one of my beautiful sun-warmed figs had a salty flavor. I realized a squirrel had visited that branch before I arrived. Now I bring them in the house and wash them before I snack. The reward is great, but the experience is just not the same!
July 20 at 09:56 EST .

   10 people like this.



   Gerty  Miss Storm---Ain't Nature wonderful? (Chuckle.. )
July 20 at 18:52 EST .

  7 people like this.



   Alice  Funny, thanks a lot squirrel... oh how lovely an 'untouched' sun-warmed fig is!
July 21 at 14:07 EST .

  4 people like this.





   StormCnter posted on Suggested Reading  Any James Lee Burke fans? There's a nice piece in today's Daily Beast about Burke and his latest.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/20/james-lee-b
urke-talks-about-his-fiction-history-and-the-american-dream.
html
July 20 at 08:46 EST .

   9 people like this.




   StormCnter posted on Recipes  I no longer do the big elaborate recipes. Been there, done that for many years. A friend sent a quick Lemon Shrimp recipe that I will try this afternoon.

Lemon Shrimp

Melt 1 stick of butter in large baking dish
Slice one lemon thinly and lay slices evenly over melted butter
Place 1 lb shelled and cleaned shrimp(leave tails on ) on top of lemon slices
Sprinkle 1 pkg Italian Seasoning mix over shrimp

Bake for 8 minutes in 350 degree oven. Turn shrimp and bake for 7 or 8 minutes more.

Serve with rice, if desired.
July 19 at 10:13 EST .

   8 people like this.



   Bettijo  This sounds wonderful. I am going to try it. Any suggestions if using frozen shrimp?
July 19 at 12:38 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Balogreene  Then you will love my cucumber salad, below. Cucumbers, red onions, and bottled dressing (I'm not sure I'd bother with the water and sweetener, except it cuts down the taste of the dressing ). Marinate for a couple of hours and serve. It would be great with that wonderful sounding shrimp.
July 19 at 23:21 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Balo,I saw the cucumber salad recipe and I agree it would go great with just about anything. I love cucumbers in any form.

Bettijo, I don't know why frozen shrimp wouldn't work just fine.
July 20 at 07:08 EST .

  6 people like this.



   MeiDei  Copied & saved! Frozen will work fine, shrimp is a quick cook.
July 20 at 12:07 EST .

  8 people like this.



   Alice  This sounds great! Will try it with fish filets too.
July 21 at 14:44 EST .

  4 people like this.





   StormCnter posted on Main Page The Lobby  Has everyone noticed how fast Lucianne.com is today? And how speedy The Connection is, too? I've been here for years and I have never seen the site work so quickly and smoothly. Thank you, Luis!
July 17 at 07:18 EST .

   3 people like this.



   CaptainLibra  Yes, lightning fast compared with yesterday. It's a pleasure to be back!
July 17 at 11:32 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter posted on Recipes  Want a quick and easy Quiche recipe? The tearoom at our Fort Worth Museum of History and Science used to offer a Southwestern Quiche. They shared the recipe with me and I have made it many times. Any basic quiche will do, but I use the following:

Preheat oven to 425

3 eggs, slightly beaten
1 1/2 cups half and half
1/4 tsp salt
Sprinkle of pepper

Mix thoroughly and set aside.

In 9" unbaked pie shell, sprinkle 1 cup shredded cheese evenly over bottom of shell.
Top cheese with 1 cup Pace's Thick and Chunky salsa, spread evenly

Pour quiche mixture over cheese and salsa.

Bake in 425 degree oven for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 and bake for about 25 minutes until crust is golden and filling is set.
July 15 at 16:43 EST .

   6 people like this.



   Balogreene  Sounds great, have to try it.
July 15 at 22:40 EST .

  4 people like this.



   MeiDei  Sounds like another good dish to use Pepper Jack cheese with! At 425 oven - this will be a must do when the cold weather hits : )
July 16 at 12:25 EST .

  2 people like this.



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