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Susannah



   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  On this July 4, I'm thinking of a very beautiful scene in The Godfather II, near the beginning of the movie. It takes place when a ship bearing Italian immigrants (among them the very young Vito Corleone ) sails into New York harbor, and all the passengers gather on the side of the ship to gaze at the Statue of Liberty.
July 4 at 17:53 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Safetydude  Like America really needed a Vito Corleone?
July 4 at 18:31 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  For every Vito type there also arrived: a Johnny Weismuller, Arthur Murray, Albert Einstein, Charlie Chaplin, Cary Grant, Walt Disney, Stan Laurel, George Gershwin, both sets of my grandparents & my Dad : ) Good & bad alike came, then as now.
July 4 at 19:12 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Susannah  No, the U.S. didn't need another gangster, but I think the point Coppola was trying to make was that these immigrants saw in America the hope of a better life. And Corleone was a nine-year-old boy on the run from the Sicilian mafia.
July 4 at 19:17 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Safetydude  Mei...& Susanna,

I was out of line and you have my apologies about Italian immigrants. I'm sure most of them were honorable and all they wanted to do was to escape the Italian Mafia.

I gotta' admit I didn't know Albert Einstein was Italian.

It took my dad a year to get his US immigration papers so he could emigrate from Sweden to the States. He was an engineer, fluent in in English and had a job waiting for him at Honeywell, in Minneapolis.

It took another year before he could send for my mother, brother and me. I saw the Statue of Liberty from the deck of our ship coming into N.Y.and went through the immigration process on Ellis Island.

I'm a little bitter about our open borders these days, and making a gangster a hero or his lifestyle something to emulate bothers me.

Full disclosure: I've never watched "The Godfather". I'm sure Vito was a credit to his business.
July 4 at 22:04 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Safety - Einstein and Gershwin were Jewish - didn't mean to imply they were Italian. Lucky Luciano also came through Ellis Island & part of the Mafia as I knew it, he had a bakery - legit (? ) don't know; my sorority sister worked there part time. My heritage is Polish; my grandfather saw the handwriting on the wall & knew turmoil was coming & got out in plenty of time - but at great personal loss. I didn't take offense at your comment. The open borders bother anyone with a working brain. The difference then & now is those who preceded the current malcontent arrivals were legal, grateful & assimilated - the Mafia being the exception - tho' they did show a code of honor when it came to neighborhood women & children. Maybe you should break down & watch the Godfather series, you might get a different take - it wasn't all glamour.
July 5 at 01:19 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  My ancestors seem to have all arrived here before there was any immigration control at all, so I have no bad or good experiences to relate. It's interesting to read and hear, though, of those who went through those rigors. As for the "Godfather" series, I am with Mei. Everyone should see at least one of them. No one is required to admire that Mob culture, of course.
July 6 at 05:38 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Tagline: "The story of the strangest passion the world has ever known!"

What's the movie?
July 4 at 16:31 EST .

   1 person like this.




   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Tagline: "Everybody remembers it how they need to."

What's the movie?
July 4 at 16:29 EST .

   1 person like this.




   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Tagline: "Earth. It was fun while it lasted."

What's the movie?
July 4 at 16:25 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  I think this one is "Armageddon".
July 6 at 05:40 EST .

 1 person like this.





   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Olivia de Havilland is 99 years old today. Born July 1, 1916.
July 1 at 19:34 EST .

   3 people like this.



   MeiDei  Boy, she has good genes, even her parents lived long lives though she has exceeded theirs. I hope she's alert and happy.
July 1 at 20:10 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Susannah  And her sister, Joan Fontaine, lived to be 96.
July 1 at 20:16 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Movie tagline: The coast is toast.
June 30 at 12:49 EST .

   1 person like this.



   StormCnter  Sounds like "San Andreas", which I am looking forward to.
June 30 at 13:17 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Susannah  Good guess, but it was "Volcano," starring Tommy Lee Jones.
June 30 at 13:55 EST .

 1 person like this.





   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Movie tagline: Not every gift is a blessing.
June 30 at 12:48 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Susannah  The Sixth Sense.
June 30 at 18:13 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  Movie tagline: This is the weekend they didn't play golf.
June 30 at 12:27 EST .

   3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Watch out for the banjo players.
June 30 at 13:22 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Susannah  Yes, indeed.
June 30 at 14:08 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Deliverance?
June 30 at 14:43 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Susannah  Yep. The only prize I can think to offer you is a banjo of your very own.
June 30 at 14:52 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Susannah posted on Movies & Reviews  What famous novel was made into a movie in 1926, 1949, 1974, 2000, 2013, and is now in development for a sixth re-make?
June 29 at 16:39 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  I think I know, but I'll wait for someone else to answer. I didn't know they were remaking it.
June 29 at 17:39 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  Is this movie worth all these remakes or does it happen when new stars need a push. And.....what is so good about this movie that there have been so many remakes? Oh, I have not a clue to the movie. Can't wait.
June 29 at 18:03 EST .

  2 people like this.



   HopeandGlory  "Wuthering Heights," Maybe?
June 29 at 19:18 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Safetydude  What makes this novel so famous? I've tried to read it several times and have yet to read it to the end.

There were so many aspiring authors at that time, like Hemingway, A.E.Hotchner, Ford Maddox Ford, Gertrude Stein who were better writers.
I guess the opulent life style described in the novel makes everyone think 'I wish that were me'.
June 29 at 19:30 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Susannah  I think Safety Dude has it...The Great Gatsby. The prose is magnificent, but otherwise it's a dull story about silly people with stupid aspirations. That was Fitzgerald's problem; he was a great prose stylist who spent most of his energy writing about inconsequentials. I would, however, recommend his novella "The Rich Boy," which as far as I know has never been made into a movie. I could be wrong about that, but the novella is worth reading.
June 29 at 21:10 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Susannah posted on Suggested Reading  I'm reading Sally Bedell Smith's "Elizabeth the Queen." It covers a lot of familiar ground, but I did find out that the relationship between the Reagans and the royal family was a lot closer than I knew. Everyone knows how highly Thatcher and Reagan regarded each other, but I didn't know that Elizabeth and Nancy Reagan became such good friends, and that Princess Margaret and Nancy Reagan were very close. Princess Margaret wrote to Nancy several times a month for decades, apparently, and after her stroke when she could no longer communicate very well, Margaret had her secretary keep up the correspondence.

This probably is not the book for you if you believe Diana was a saint. Bedell, who has already written a bio of Diana, offers proof that Diana lied about her husband and the rest of the family. (To cut her some slack, Diana was mentally ill, and was ill before her marriage. ) But Bedell shows that Charles wasn't having an affair with Camilla, and only returned to Camilla after he discovered that Diana had already cheated on him with a bodyguard and then James Hewitt.
June 27 at 16:32 EST .

   5 people like this.



   StormCnter  I've read it, Susannah, and Sally Bedell Smith never disappoints. I've been fascinated with Elizabeth since she was a mere Princess. In sixth grade, I wrote an essay about her, using the only resources available in 1951 to a kid in rural Texas: my family's Encyclopedia Americana and Life magazine. At the same age, I devoured Marion Crawford's "The Little Princesses" and when Elizabeth was crowned, I watched her coronation on television. Secretly, however, I considered myself Princess Margaret Rose, whom I thought was much more exciting.
June 28 at 07:43 EST .

  6 people like this.



   MeiDei  i hadn't heard that Diana was mentally ill - only read the book written by her butler (? ) That tidbit has got to sting William & Harry.
June 29 at 09:02 EST .

  5 people like this.



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