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Household Hints



   MeiDei  Food storage tips - meats, herbs, dairy, fruits & veggies
http://www.buzzfeed.com/christinebyrne/how-to-store-your-gro
ceries?utm_term=.chddVN8orl#.jxAeX28R0o
August 20 at 11:29 EST .

   10 people like this.




   MeiDei  How to vacuum seal a freezer bag w/out a machine - clever trick




August 19 at 18:56 EST .

   6 people like this.




   MeiDei  Why I don't use my pressure cooker....
   August 6 at 10:32 EST .

   5 people like this.



   FlatCityGirl  Oh, my stars!

I'm guessing that those two bare light bulbs in the ceiling had a cover over them until the lid took it out.

I haven't used a pressure cooker in years. In fact, I haven't seen mine since I made the move from Virginia to Texas --it might have been sold in a garage sale in Virginia. I seldom used it because I had heard horror stories from mother about things just such as this happening to people, and was always afraid it would happen to me. Mother used one a lot when I was a kid. I remember that hissing sound, and the rocking of the doohickey on top.

Supposedly, the new ones have some kind of a safety feature that keeps disasters like this from happening.
August 8 at 09:23 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Mine is still in box, never used - 35+ years - time to donate it.
August 8 at 17:35 EST .

  3 people like this.



   FlatCityGirl  You might want to hold up on that until Antiques Roadshow is next in your area . . .
August 9 at 14:09 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Those things terrify me. I had a really nice one my mother gave me the first year I was married. I never used the pressure part, but that heavy pan produced wonderful fudge.
August 20 at 13:30 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Balogreene  My sister likes the new electric ones, they pressure up, and down, on a timer.
October 14 at 20:25 EST .

  5 people like this.





   MeiDei  If you ever have something plastic melt in your oven go on-line to find out how to remove it properly for your oven - self clean vs. regular. I was surprised to find my query was first to come up on the list of "how-to" - felt less stupid : ) How a plastic handled black spatula ended up inside, sight unseen, is unnerving. I have a self-clean which means opening doors & windows for ventilation (not great in cold weather ) - not necessary if a regular oven. BTW - the spatula is fine, just missing the end grip. Now I need a wooden one to lift up the offending blob.
April 11 at 12:23 EST .

   7 people like this.




   MeiDei  Here's a hint for making mini meat loaves (forget the website this came from ) especially good for a single person or cooking for two. Using your own recipe:
Spray 13x9-inch pan with cooking spray. Place meat mixture in pan;
Pat into 10 inch x 4-inch rectangle.
Cut lengthwise down center and then crosswise into fourths to make 8 loaves. Separate loaves, using spatula, so no edges are touching. Top loaves with whatever you normally do - Ketchup, bacon, cheese, jalapenos.....
Bake @ 350 - 18 to 20 minutes or until loaves are no longer pink in center and meat thermometer inserted in center of loaves reads 160°F.
Eat. Wrap & freeze the remainder for a day you don't feel like cooking, reheat in pan or microwave,
November 10 at 18:29 EST .

   15 people like this.



   MeiDei  Just noticed the original copy said a 450 oven - that seems high to me, use your best judgement. Might be because their recipe included Bisquick - beats me.
November 10 at 18:54 EST .

  9 people like this.



   Balogreene  I'm going to post Butter-Barbecue-Meat loaves, one of my favorites, on the recipe wall
November 15 at 16:58 EST .

  8 people like this.





   MeiDei  Read where the water we hard boil eggs in contains calcium leeched from the shells & that we shouldn't throw away the water. Made rice using it, didn't notice any change in taste or texture - a freebie boost of calcium. This was from a website on making ricotta cheese; they suggest not throwing away the whey (water ) & repurposing it since it contains a lot of protein. Either one would be a good base for a soup.
November 9 at 11:55 EST .

   14 people like this.



   BirdsNest  We always used the whey after making ricotta. I liked using it in place of water or milk in breadmaking. Same for any recipe that calls for milk. Cats love it. Chickens love it. As for the water from boiled eggs, I would likely use that once cooled as a drink for my plants. And for us, all eggshells go into the compost pile.
November 15 at 07:35 EST .

  8 people like this.





   MeiDei  Good use for lemons even if they've gone bad, ants, mineral deposits in tea kettle & stain remover - watch video http://www.dailyfinance.com/2014/07/07/salvage-overripe-lemo
ns-did-you-know-savings-experiment/?ncid=txtlnkusaolp0000134
6&utm_source=zergnet.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ze
rgnet_284097&ncid=txtlnkusaolp00001365
November 5 at 23:09 EST .

   16 people like this.




   Gram77  Looks like no one visits this site.
October 27 at 07:49 EST .

   15 people like this.



   Flaming Sword  Hi Gram,
Peanut butter bait works. Boric acid, on any drug store shelf.
http://insects.about.com/od/HouseholdPes
ts/a/How-To-Make-And-Use-Homemade-Ant-Ba
its.htm


You must be able to tolerate a massive parade of ants for about 3 days.Put in on your kitchen counter ,bathroom counter out of the way. Back corner? I put it in a jar lid. About a tablespoon. I make more than I need and keep in in a jar so I can replace it once a day or two as it dries up. When it starts to dry, they won’t eat it.

Usually the parade ends about day 3. And I don’t see one ant for 4-6months.
October 28 at 16:54 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Gram77  Boy these helpful hints are way better than my $ 125.00 that wound up being useless. Many thanks, and incidentally I am happily stitching away. : )
October 28 at 18:08 EST .

  9 people like this.





   Gram77  I've been here on Household Hints before and here I am again. Every Fall I get teeny tiny ants (you must really get down and look ) and I got some terrific helpful hints. But... nothing worked. We had the inside of the entire house and all around the outside treated for $125.00. This company also placed small sugar ant traps in the area we saw the most activity. The critters stayed, the treatment did not help either. I spray constantly and can get perhaps a day or two relief and then we are back to the beginning. Everything that I can bag or put into plastic containers I've done and I don't leave anything in the sink OR the dishwasher. I'm thinking of locking the door and moving. Help!!
October 16 at 12:08 EST .

   14 people like this.




   Bettijo  Since I live alone, I hesitate to buy things like heavy cream because it spoils before I can use it up. Now that I know I can freeze it, I will be less hesitant to buy it. I already keep butter in freezer. I found this on Rachael Ray’s web site. bj

Can you freeze cream?

Heavy cream (at least 40% fat ) freezes well - lighter creams and half and half do not hold up in the freezer. You can freeze the entire unopened carton, just double wrap in freezer bags. Thaw cream in the fridge, and shake the carton prior to opening - do not refreeze!

Here are some tips on freezing other dairy products - all items should be thawed in fridge and should not be refrozen:

Butter - Freeze only high-quality butter made from pasteurized cream. Double wrap store container in freezer bags.

Cheese - Hard or semi-hard cheeses can be frozen. Frozen cheese will be crumbly and a little dry and will not slice as well, but the flavor will be just as good as fresh cheese. Freeze cheese in small pieces - no more than ½ pound per chunk. Seal it in foil, freezer wrap, plastic wrap or a zip lock.

Cottage cheese - Cream style and dry cottage cheese and ricotta cheese can be frozen for a month. Cream style may separate when thawed.

Cream cheese - Block-style can be frozen for later use in cooking, dips or as icing.

Cheese food products, such as sauces, dips, or processed cheese usually freeze fine. If in real doubt, freeze a small quantity and check after 24 hours by thawing it. If pleased with the results, freeze the rest. Otherwise, do not freeze.

Ice cream - A plastic wrap laid tightly on the surface of partially used containers of ice cream helps prevent surface changes. Homemade ice cream is difficult to store for any length of time because it becomes grainy. Commercial products have added milk solids and gelatin to prevent this.

Milk - Pasteurized homogenized milk may be frozen, including low and non-fat. Some quality change may be noted upon thawing. Stirring or shaking may help restore smoothness.

Sour cream, yogurt and buttermilk - All of the cultured, soured dairy products lose their smooth texture when frozen. They become grainy and sometimes separate out their water. They can still be used for cooking. Flavored yogurts may be more stable because of the fruit and sugar.

Eggs can be stored for at least one month, covered in the refrigerator. Freezing is often unnecessary.

Whole Eggs - Thoroughly mix yolks and whites - do not whip in air. To prevent graininess, add 1 tablespoon sugar or 1/2 teaspoon salt per cup whole eggs, depending on intended use. You can strain through a sieve or colander to improve uniformity. Freeze in a freezer zip lock, with some room for expansion in the freezer.

Another method of freezing whole egg mixture is to use ice cube trays. Measure 3 tablespoons of egg mixture into each compartment of an ice tray. Freeze until
September 10 at 15:56 EST .

   16 people like this.



   MeiDei  I freeze butter all the time, have had no problems using putting the box in as is. Also milk and cheese. Never tried heavy cream but will as I'm always discarding it after a family get together. Maybe someone can tell me how to make cheese or butter out of what is leftover.
September 13 at 17:36 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Balogreene  We have an upright freezer, and freeze a lot as we also shop at Sam's Club. It is amazing what you can buy in bulk if you have storage ( we traded a nice mower for the freezer, we're all happy. ) Butter, meats, cream, etc.
October 7 at 23:48 EST .

  14 people like this.





   Bettijo  And we drink this stuff?

Coca-Cola (or Coke ) is the most recognized brand in the world. The dark, carbonated, sugary beverage has become the most widely consumed drink in the world since WWII. There are many studies and documentaries showing the ill effects of Coke on the human body, but this addictive drink has other, more beneficial uses that the Coca-Cola Company may not want you to know:

16 Uses for Coke

1. Remove stains from china
Soak stained china in Coke for a few hours, and it will remove all the stains.

2. Remove marker stains from a carpet
Pour Coke on the marker stain, and then scrub it with a soapy solution for a quick and easy cleanup.

3. Clean burnt residue off of pots and pans
Pour enough Coke to cover the burnt residue in the pot/pan and let it soak overnight. You’ll be amazed how easily the gunk comes off in the morning.

4. Get rid of grease stains your detergent can’t handle
Pour some Coke into the washing machine with your greasy clothes and see the magic.

5. Diet Coke can fix a bad hair-dye job

Did you accidentally botch up your hair dye? Just soak your hair in Diet Coke for 15 minutes and watch the dye fade away.

6. Strip paint from metallic surfaces
Soak a towel with Coke and leave it on the painted metallic surface for several hours. When you remove the towel – the paint will come off with it.

7. Keep your car battery working for longer
If your car battery’s terminals are covered in corrosion, pour Coke on it and watch how the corrosion melts away.

8. Effective slug pesticide
If your garden is experiencing a slug infestation, pour a Coke into a bowl and leave it outside overnight. The sugar will draw them in, and the acidity will kill these pests.

9. Remove grout from tiles with ease
Pour Coke on gritty tiles and let it sit for a few minutes. The grout should be easily removed now, leaving you with clean tiles.

10. Clean your toilet
Pour a can of Coke into your toilet and leave it overnight. The acidity in the Coke will strip off any nasty residue that accumulated in the bowl.

11. Make old coins shine again
Soak dirty coins in Coke for a few hours and then rinse them – they’ll look like they were minted yesterday.

12. Coke + aluminum foil = clean chrome
Pour Coke on dirty chrome surfaces, and then wipe away with aluminum foil. The chrome will look shiny and new again.

13. Coke makes for an effective insect repellent
Pour a can into a bowl and leave it outside for an hour before you entertain. When your party arrives, move the bowl away and enjoy an insect-free environment. The bugs will be too busy with the Coke to harass your friends.

14. Remove blood stains from clothes
Soak the bloody part in Coke for an hour, and then wash it away. (Repeat if necessary )

15. Get rid of gum stuck in your hair
Soak the gum in Coke for 15 minutes and simply wipe it away.

16. Clean
August 25 at 21:58 EST .

   16 people like this.



   Bettijo  16. Clean up oil stains from floors
August 29 at 09:23 EST .

  12 people like this.



   FlatCityGirl  Hmmmmm . . . that's kind of scary when you think about drinking the stuff. What's it doing to your insides?
September 2 at 09:35 EST .

  12 people like this.



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