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Suggested Reading



   StormCnter  I'm just finishing Daniel Halper's "Clinton, Inc.". Good book, full of tidbits that I hadn't read before and I thought I'd heard it all. It's a pretty quick read and worth the time. You might get surprised about Chelsea.
17 hours ago .

   3 people like this.




   Belwhatter  Just dropping by to recommend Brad Thor's latest - "Hidden Order" thriller based on the Federal Reserve - being Brad he imparts a great deal of the history of the Fed into the action. Also for ex pat Brits, Jeffrey Archer has a new series going called the Clifton series - an ongoing saga that's a real page turner - three down, waiting for #4.
Yesterday at 20:10 EST .

   10 people like this.




   Balogreene  I am currently listening to "The Landscape Turned Red" by Stephen Sears. It is a history book, about Antietam. It starts early on in the Civil War, cause you begin to get really tired of McClellan, and believe Lincoln has more patience than Job. I am listening, and working (I do this often, I just keep repeating sections I wasn't listening to. )

So, this evening I have to go to the grocery store. I just heard the Yankees found three cigars wrapped in General Lee's battle plans. I want to find out what happens next (yes, I really do ), so I took my iPhone and listened while I shopped.

I read about the Civil War all the time, I obviously know the major parts, this is a good book, I wanted to know what I already knew.
Tuesday at 22:16 EST .

   4 people like this.



   Balogreene  McClellan got the battle plan, but he disregarded it, as he did most things. I'm hoping this Labor Day weekend I can get up there, it's only about 3 hours, and my Miata convertible should make the trip fun.
Yesterday at 00:33 EST .

  4 people like this.





   Gram77  I picked up a book for 50 cents at a Goodwill Store. The title is A Walk Across The Sun; the author is Corban Addison. The inside cover grabbed me. Has anyone read this?
August 22 at 16:02 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  I've read it, Gram. It's a goodie.
August 23 at 06:45 EST .

  3 people like this.





   Bettijo  Question: I read Kindle on my iPad. Is there any way to delete books I have read from both Denice and Cloud permanently? My library is getting unmanageable. Also can books be organized by category like in folders? Thanks.
August 20 at 02:38 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Bettijo, I would help if I could, but I still buy physical books. I'll do some research and see if there is an answer. I'm sure there will be.
August 21 at 08:26 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  I did a bit of research, Bettijo. Have you tried Amazon Kindle Support? The Kindle forums seem to think the support group is really good. One of the posters on the forum had tried deleting books and found them only partially deleted or still in the file on Cloud. She said Amazon solved it.

Sign in here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/
contact-us?ie=UTF8&nodeId=200939330&ref_
=hp_ss_comp_cu_v4


and then under "What can we help you with?", choose Kindle. Then you can type your problem and select how you want them to talk to you.
August 21 at 08:33 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Balogreene  Bettijo, I normally read on my Kindle, but, I do have my books on my iPad. As to deleting from the Cloud, I normally don't want to, so haven't tried.

But, for organization, I do that all the time on my Kindle and my iPad, and the cloud. When you are in your library, hit the whatever that is (three bars ) in the upper left corner. then hit collections, in the top right corner is a plus sign, hit it to create new collections. When you type in the new name, it shows you each book you have, and allows you to add it to the collection.
August 22 at 19:31 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Clipped wings  I read on my iPad and Kindle both. But I still manage them through the Amazon site. Go under your account and select manage my content. You will see a screen with all of your books and you can delete or change location, etc. I haven't tried doing this on the iPad but think it should work the same.
August 24 at 11:08 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Clipped wings  Let me amend that comment. I manage this on my home computer.
August 24 at 11:09 EST .

  4 people like this.





   Balogreene  By Mysel and then some by Lauren Bacall. I never read "star" books, but something led me to this one. According to Kindle I'm 12% through! and I've fallen in love. Betty is a mere 18, it is 1942, and she has spent two years working for the USO, auditioning, dreaming, and doubting herself. She has already made lifelong friends of major stars, she is starting on Broadway. A wonderfully successful woman, I can't wait to read more. And, it's $2 on Kindle.
August 15 at 23:44 EST .

   10 people like this.



   StormCnter  Sometimes memoirs by a celebrity (or about a celebrity ) are surprisingly rewarding. I'm glad you found Bacall's book. Over the years, I have particularly enjoyed Ann Miller's "Miller's High Life", Nick Tosches' "Dino" (Dean Martin ) and Evelyn Keyes' "Scarlett O'Hara's Younger Sister".
August 16 at 07:26 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  I forgot to mention Michael Caine's "What's It All About", which is a delightful romp and any of David Niven's fine memoirs, particularly "Bring on the Empty Horses".
August 18 at 07:52 EST .

  4 people like this.





   Balogreene  The Landscape Turned Red, by Stephen W. Sears. I've got this on Audible.com, but that doesn't matter. It's the story of Antietam. I'm only part way through it, but, it starts with stories of McLellan, and his mismanagement of the battles. It is a good history. I'm going to have to repeat it many times to get the full story, if it was a reading book, I'd do the same. I think in the next few weeks I'll run up there to see the Memorial, and know more of the battle.
August 14 at 01:50 EST .

   7 people like this.



   StormCnter  Civil War books, no matter how scholarly the presentation, make me sad. That happens when your side loses, perhaps. I still haven't watched the last chapter of Ken Burns' series because I can't bear to surrender again.

I'll tell my uncle about your book, Balo. He's tougher than I.
August 15 at 14:02 EST .

  7 people like this.



   Balogreene  Storm, my dad's family was from the Charleston-Savannah corridor. They lost much when that scoundrel Sherman came through (they weren't slave-holders, they raised Arabians, and were Factors on the wharves ). My mother had an ancestor in the Third Michigan. He didn't have much at either end of the war. I've always sided more with my Southern relatives, but was raised outside of Chicago. I've found my family's land and heritage in SC and am so proud of all they gave, they fought with The Swamp Fox, and with Lee, and with Patton, a great history.
August 15 at 23:52 EST .

  8 people like this.



   MeiDei  If it will make you feel better, this northerner, and several more, never liked Sherman's burning - found it insult to injury and made little sense. Right or wrong, didn't like the confiscation of Lee's home either. Ken Burn's docu-series was well done, haunting. What I most took away from it was the prose of the letters written home, from both sides. This may seem crass but war is hell & it should be - to keep us from taking it lightly.
August 16 at 13:44 EST .

  7 people like this.



   Balogreene  MeiDei. It's strange, but I think Sherman in the South, and Sheridan in the Shenandoah, ended the war more quickly, than had they not rampaged through the South. They cut the supply lines, and transportation.
Yes, it was hard on the civilians, but as my great-great-grandfather told the man whose plantation he was financial manager for, "our boys are safe, we are safe, your slaves are safe." They lost their food, horses, and mules. But, had their home, and knew where to get food (they had probably hidden it ).
August 18 at 00:11 EST .

  4 people like this.





   StormCnter  For those who haven't yet read (or ordered ) Ron Kessler's "First Family Detail", you might reconsider. I am almost finished with it and have been disappointed. Yes, there is lots of dish, but we've heard most of it over the years. I had not known that Jimmy Carter never spoke to his agents or his airplane crew. I also had not known that Al Gore was disliked by the agents who chauffeured him around because he (I'm trying to be discreet here ) regularly issued his own bodily gases in the car. I had not known Spiro Agnew was apparently a well-known and skilled "swordsman" with a gal in several ports. Most of the rest of the book is given over to details of how the "protectees" are covered, sites are secured and security information shared. A lot of the book is taken up with internal Secret Service feuds and squabbles with the FBI and HHS. Sometimes a writer such as Kessler has simply written too many books and either forgets or thinks no one will mind if they overlap.
August 11 at 08:02 EST .

   11 people like this.



   Balogreene  Thanks
August 14 at 01:50 EST .

  7 people like this.





   Susannah  In a recent issue of National Review, I read a very interesting article by Adam Bellow (son of Saul ), who's the founding editor of Broadside books, the conservative imprint at HarperCollins. He talked about a subject close to my heart, which is the relative lack of conservative voices in current literary and popular fiction. (There's no shortage of conservative non-fiction. ) He's trying to encourage good conservative novelists to write good fiction that's not overtly political, but is conservative in its underlying values. He's started a website, www.libertyislandmag.com, which is intended to foster this. I have examined it thoroughly, but the concept is one that should be applauded.
August 8 at 12:53 EST .

   11 people like this.



   Susannah  I meant to say that "I haven't examined it thoroughly." Anyway...www.libertyislandmag.com
August 8 at 12:54 EST .

  11 people like this.



   StormCnter  The problem for me is that I'm halfway through a novel when suddenly the writer's bias jumps out. So, how to know ahead of time? And the quandary is whether to finish the book or toss it. In nonfiction, I'm seldom surprised.
August 10 at 07:52 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Susannah  Good point. Bellow addressed it by commenting that he didn't want to publish overtly political fiction, where you get bludgeoned over the head by the writer's ideology, but the kind of fiction that embodies conservative themes and values, thus making the case more subtly.
August 10 at 09:49 EST .

  6 people like this.





   Susannah  I picked up a copy of "The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton," and have read "The Lady Maid's Bell," the point of which eluded me. So I checked with a couple of the online Wharton discussion forums, and no one there was able to figure it out, either. Wharton seems to have been trying to be too subtle for her own good; she was usually a much more straightforward writer, which I think is why she's lasted.
August 4 at 12:45 EST .

   17 people like this.



   StormCnter  Better you than I, Susannah. I am not very patient with trying to hack through too much subtlety in fiction. I end up feeling intimidated, as if I am not smart enough to get the author's point.
August 4 at 13:31 EST .

  18 people like this.



   Susannah  I think Edie had just recently read "The Turn of the Screw" by her pal Henry James, and was trying to outscrew, so to speak, Henry.

Don't feel bad, Storm. No one else can figure out what Wharton was trying to do, either. Sometimes it's the author's fault.
August 8 at 12:57 EST .

  11 people like this.



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