TheConnection Walls
29 walls

     Main Page
The Lobby
     Blessings
     Coffee Klatch
     Comments
Suggestions
     Computers
&Tech Issues
     Crafts
     Dogs, Cats
& Critters
     Events
     Faith
     Gardening &
Landscaping
     Health & Diet
     Household Hints
     Jokes
     Movies & Reviews
     Music
     Nostalgia
     Pet Peeves
     Photography
     Politics
     The Range
2nd Amendment
     Recipes
     The Road
Automobilia
     Shopper's Beware
Caveat Emptor
     Sports
   Suggested Reading
   
    Reload Wall
    Admin Photos
    Members Photos

    Login
 

     Suggested Viewing/Listening
     Travel
     Veterans' Page
& Militaria
     Weird
But True

Members Photos
3 out of 10
see all

   

   

   






Suggested Reading



   MeiDei  Random House book club just highlighted this book for the week, sounds good - Burning bright by Petrie (there ate several books sharing the title )- Lee Childs (Jack Reacher ) highly recommends what seems to be the 2nd in a series
https://www.amazon.com/Burning-Bright-Peter-Ash-Novel/dp/039
9174575
22 hours ago .




   StormCnter  Anyone else reading or having read any of Cormac McCarthy? He has won all kinds of awards, including a Pulitzer and has written ten novels (I think ). I've read four of them, All the Pretty Horses, The Crossing, No Country for Old Men, Cities of the Plain. The thing about McCarthy's books is that the plots are riveting, the characters are intriguing, the settings are familiar to me (Southwest Texas and Eastern New Mexico ), but in most fiction we can safely assume the lead character will survive, maybe heartbroken, maybe injured, maybe disillusioned, but alive. There is no such comfort in a McCarthy story. No character is safe. But, I love these books.
Thursday at 08:59 EST .




   StormCnter  Turned the final page on "Missing, Presumed..." by Susie Steiner. I knew as soon as I was into the first chapters it was probably going to be a series and according to the description from the Goodreads review, I was right. I'm not fond of series, but I recommend this book. It's a page-turner and fairly unpredictable. Quick reading, also.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26141649-missing-presumed
January 17 at 06:04 EST .

   1 person like this.




   StormCnter  Ok, I completed Lydia Millet's "Sweet Lamb of Heaven", which was long-listed for the National Book Award for fiction. Here is the NY Times review:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/01/books/review/lydia-millets
-sweet-lamb-of-heaven.html?_r=0


I kept trying to like it, I really did. But, I don't like books about the occult, especially novels which never really explain. Stephen King does occult very well, and I never feel misled at the end of his books. To each his own, but I won't be recommending "Sweet Lamb of Heaven".
January 7 at 16:19 EST .

   1 person like this.



   MeiDei  We do have reading certain books in common, I'm not into the occult but can get through King or Koontz books; and then there was one I mentioned earlier this year - about perfume and the very expensive ambergris (whale vomit ) that washes up on beaches usually after a storm - the subject was much more interesting than the occult references. Sorry, title escapes me.
January 8 at 12:18 EST .

  2 people like this.





   MeiDei  The on-line book club this past week featured "The Sleepwalker" - this review caught my attention http://www.jennsbookshelves.com/2017/01/03/review-the-sleepw
alker-by-chris-bohjalian/

As a 3 or 4 year old I was known to sleepwalk twice, I guess it's common and readily outgrown early on. According to this review the author researched sleepwalking extensively.
January 7 at 03:56 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  One of my nieces was a sleepwalker as a little one. I was on constant alert when she spent the night with us. My nightmare was the backdoor to the swimming pool. Yes, she outgrew it.
January 7 at 05:29 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  This really has my attention. My son was a sleep walker and managed to leave the house twice over the years. When he left for the Army at age 18 I was frantic. I am going to check this book out.
January 8 at 08:28 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Gee Gram, my parents were frantically amused as I only got as far as the old fashioned claw foot tub with my pillow & blanket - Dad sure was startled; I wonder if that's when "your daughter" (surely no child of his ) defined my unusual or disapproved behavior started. [smile]. Dad would call my mother in post haste to get me out so he could get to the business at hand so to speak : )

Leaving the house, however, IS worrisome and I can only imagine your concern. He grew out of it - yes?
January 8 at 12:34 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  The last I knew about his sleep walking was when he was 15. Somewhere between there and 18 and joining the service was when he must have out grown it but I did worry a bit. Can you imagine a soldier wandering around the barracks in his skivies?
January 8 at 17:28 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Well, now that I have that image in mind .... [grin]
January 9 at 12:18 EST .

 1 person like this.





   MeiDei  I just finished Wellington's "The Hydra Protocol" - a spy novel, joint mission between US & Russia to shut down a nuclear multi missile launcher, circa cold war era, in a soviet satellite nation. I liked the style of writing, the characters & the plot conflicts - except for one far fetched scenario near the end. If you like Clancy, Thor, Rollins, etc., you'll probably enjoy this one.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18505790-the-hydra-protoc
ol
January 5 at 12:04 EST .

   2 people like this.




   StormCnter  Anyone else read any of Laura Lippman's books? I just finished "Wilde Lake" and it's as easily readable as are most of her books. As in too many novels these days, politics occasionally intrude, but I have learned to disregard a novelist's not-so-slyly inserted biases if they don't take up much page space. Here is the Washington Post's review of "Wilde Lake"
https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/wilde-lak
e-one-of-laura-lippmans-finest-novels-feels-personal/2016/04
/27/b034e9e0-fcd5-11e5-80e4-c381214de1a3_story.html?utm_term
=.c38330d75b6c
January 5 at 10:43 EST .

   2 people like this.




   StormCnter  I have recommended this book a gazillion times over forty years and consider it one of the best I have ever read. Because it's historical, it doesn't go out of date. "Freedom at Midnight" by Collins and LaPierre. The book is apparently out of print and available only in libraries now, but my daughter gave me the unabridged CD book for Christmas. We spent the last three days driving across Texas and back and have listened to almost half the CDs. I had forgotten just how good that book is. It's about Lord Mountbatten's direction and supervision of the severance of India from the British Empire in 1947 and at the same time, the creation of Pakistan. Nehru, Gandhi, Jinnah, the Indian princes, the Raj. This is from Amazon: "...the best-selling book described as irreplaceable by Le Monde, Paris. It is a poignant reminder of the defining moments of the end of the British Raj, the independence of 400 million people, their division into India and the newly created Pakistan. Time Magazine raised a poetic salutation to this brilliantly written book, hailing it as the Song of India . . . illuminated like scenes in a pageant." I enthusiastically recommend a book (or a CD set ) that you will not forget.
December 29 at 16:34 EST .

   3 people like this.




   MeiDei  Here's a link to an article about reading and brain health ... we are doing something right!
http://undergroundhealthreporter.com/reading-boosts-brain-po
wer/?utm_swu=9290
December 26 at 13:35 EST .

   2 people like this.




   Gram77  I am considering the following books for the new year: Dark Town by T. Mullen, The One Man by A. Gross, The Tumbling Turner Sisters by J. Fay, and The Three-Year Swim Club by J. Checkoway.
December 26 at 12:17 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  I've read Dark Town, Gram, and it's a good one. I'll look up the others.
December 29 at 16:27 EST .

  2 people like this.



     Next Page