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Suggested Reading



   StormCnter  Have you ever gotten midway into a book and found missing pages? I was at page 88 in "His Bloody Project", a finalist for the Booker Man prize and a book that has gotten rave reviews, when I realized the next 20 pages were missing. I spent 24.99 for that novel at Barnes & Noble and I was furious. My first email to B&N got a form response about their 14-day return policy. I had purchased the book along with 14 others at the end of December. However, my second email to B&N's customer service got a promise to send another copy of the book and a return label. So, I was satisfied. BTW, I also wrote to the publisher to tell them about their disappointing messup.
Yesterday at 07:02 EST .

   1 person like this.



   StormCnter  Update: The publisher emailed the missing pages, said it was aware of a problem in the "third printing", apologized, and is sending me a replacement book.
14 hours ago .




   StormCnter  Where have our readers gone? I think everyone is busy, but we're still reading books. I just finished "Pete Rose, An American Dilemma" by Kostya Kennedy. I've always been a baseball fan, but the American League, not the National League. However, any sports fan is familiar with the Pete Rose story, the records, the hustle, the respect of his peers and bosses, the reckless destruction of all that with his gambling. The book was published in 2014. I have zero regard for Pete Rose and I hope he never is eligible for the Hall of Fame, but his story is fascinating. I recommend this book.
https://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/books/2014/03/10/book-revie
w-pete-rose-american-dilemma-kostya-kennedy/J2AvOerjCVR9saBH
jYcwfP/story.html
February 14 at 06:43 EST .

   3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  I am reading constantly but the books I like are.no way on the same level as what you guys read. I am a lightweight. I do enjoy reading about what books you all choose. I guess once the weather gets nicer I will be outside more and not reading as much.
Yesterday at 20:07 EST .


   StormCnter  Bird, our choices as readers are of course personal and the point is, I think, getting pleasure from our books. It doesn't matter what you or I read. But, if we aren't discussing the books you are interested in, please talk about ones you enjoy and you may be surprised that we have read some of them, too.
13 hours ago .




   StormCnter  I am almost finished with "Conclave" by Robert Harris. I found it fascinating. The story is set a few years from now and the Pope has just died. The Cardinals gather at the Vatican for the election of a new Pope. There is intrigue, scandal, elbow-throwing, pomp, prayer, but most of all, the inside workings of what is necessary at such a time. The garments, the rituals, the rules. I am not Catholic, so know very little about the faith, but I have really enjoyed this book. I recommend it.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29397486-conclave?from_s
earch=true
February 4 at 08:17 EST .

   3 people like this.



   MeiDei  Thanks for the tip & link. Read the reviews - one went political re: the electoral college (no understanding of it ). Really whet my appetite to read this book, when you have a large group of people w/egos & ambition you get intrigue be it palace, government, Church or business - the dark side of human nature - wickedly fascinating ; )
February 4 at 12:45 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  Just read the review of Conclave on Amazon. Really bland review, but Goodreads review is excellent and so were other reader reviews. Think I need to check this book out. Quite different from what I read but it's well worth a try.
February 5 at 09:00 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Ok, a caveat. I really enjoyed this book. But the ending surprised and dismayed me. I'm interested in what anyone else thinks after reading it.
February 5 at 09:03 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Gram77  Goodreads had a message on my email about new February books just out and one caught my eye. The title is The Orphan's Tale by Pam Jenoff. The book has a good review and of course my list has grown again. Those of you readers, take a look. You might also find it interesting.
February 1 at 08:29 EST .

   3 people like this.



   StormCnter  "the "Nightingale" meets "Water for Elephants"? I'm in!
February 1 at 10:44 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  Exactly what I was thinking, Storm.
February 1 at 12:03 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  "Pachinko" is another that looks interesting - from that same section of the Goodreads email.
February 3 at 10:23 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Gram77  This does look good. Love the book cover.
February 3 at 12:10 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter  Sometimes, I read a book that is outside my usual preferred genres. And, sometimes, I uncover a story that I end up loving. Such is ""Before the Wind", Jim Lynch. It is a sailing story, about a family of legendary sailboat builders and famous sailors. In the beginning, I had to keep reminding myself this is fiction, not a memoir, because I kept wanting to look at the picture section to see these people. There was no picture section, of course. I don't sail, I've never been to the northwestern Pacific, I don't know one sailboat from another. But, I loved this book.
This is from Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25982554-before-the-wind
?from_search=true
January 27 at 13:41 EST .

   3 people like this.



   Gram77  Yet another book to add to my list. That list can be measured by the yard! Thanks for yet another book to check out.
January 28 at 11:12 EST .

  2 people like this.





   MeiDei  Random House book club just highlighted this book for the week, sounds good - Burning bright by Petrie (there ate several books sharing the title )- Lee Childs (Jack Reacher ) highly recommends what seems to be the 2nd in a series
https://www.amazon.com/Burning-Bright-Peter-Ash-Novel/dp/039
9174575
January 20 at 14:09 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Gram77  Just added this to my library list. My list to purchase is way too large.
January 21 at 17:17 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter  Anyone else reading or having read any of Cormac McCarthy? He has won all kinds of awards, including a Pulitzer and has written ten novels (I think ). I've read four of them, All the Pretty Horses, The Crossing, No Country for Old Men, Cities of the Plain. The thing about McCarthy's books is that the plots are riveting, the characters are intriguing, the settings are familiar to me (Southwest Texas and Eastern New Mexico ), but in most fiction we can safely assume the lead character will survive, maybe heartbroken, maybe injured, maybe disillusioned, but alive. There is no such comfort in a McCarthy story. No character is safe. But, I love these books.
January 19 at 08:59 EST .

   2 people like this.




   StormCnter  Turned the final page on "Missing, Presumed..." by Susie Steiner. I knew as soon as I was into the first chapters it was probably going to be a series and according to the description from the Goodreads review, I was right. I'm not fond of series, but I recommend this book. It's a page-turner and fairly unpredictable. Quick reading, also.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26141649-missing-presumed
January 17 at 06:04 EST .

   3 people like this.




   StormCnter  Ok, I completed Lydia Millet's "Sweet Lamb of Heaven", which was long-listed for the National Book Award for fiction. Here is the NY Times review:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/01/books/review/lydia-millets
-sweet-lamb-of-heaven.html?_r=0


I kept trying to like it, I really did. But, I don't like books about the occult, especially novels which never really explain. Stephen King does occult very well, and I never feel misled at the end of his books. To each his own, but I won't be recommending "Sweet Lamb of Heaven".
January 7 at 16:19 EST .

   2 people like this.



   MeiDei  We do have reading certain books in common, I'm not into the occult but can get through King or Koontz books; and then there was one I mentioned earlier this year - about perfume and the very expensive ambergris (whale vomit ) that washes up on beaches usually after a storm - the subject was much more interesting than the occult references. Sorry, title escapes me.
January 8 at 12:18 EST .

  3 people like this.





   MeiDei  The on-line book club this past week featured "The Sleepwalker" - this review caught my attention http://www.jennsbookshelves.com/2017/01/03/review-the-sleepw
alker-by-chris-bohjalian/

As a 3 or 4 year old I was known to sleepwalk twice, I guess it's common and readily outgrown early on. According to this review the author researched sleepwalking extensively.
January 7 at 03:56 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  One of my nieces was a sleepwalker as a little one. I was on constant alert when she spent the night with us. My nightmare was the backdoor to the swimming pool. Yes, she outgrew it.
January 7 at 05:29 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  This really has my attention. My son was a sleep walker and managed to leave the house twice over the years. When he left for the Army at age 18 I was frantic. I am going to check this book out.
January 8 at 08:28 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Gee Gram, my parents were frantically amused as I only got as far as the old fashioned claw foot tub with my pillow & blanket - Dad sure was startled; I wonder if that's when "your daughter" (surely no child of his ) defined my unusual or disapproved behavior started. [smile]. Dad would call my mother in post haste to get me out so he could get to the business at hand so to speak : )

Leaving the house, however, IS worrisome and I can only imagine your concern. He grew out of it - yes?
January 8 at 12:34 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  The last I knew about his sleep walking was when he was 15. Somewhere between there and 18 and joining the service was when he must have out grown it but I did worry a bit. Can you imagine a soldier wandering around the barracks in his skivies?
January 8 at 17:28 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Well, now that I have that image in mind .... [grin]
January 9 at 12:18 EST .

 1 person like this.



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