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Suggested Reading



   MeiDei  Just finished Louise Penny's latest Inspector Gamache novel "The Long Way Home". Now to wait another year for the continuing story.
22 hours ago .

   4 people like this.




   Balogreene  I just finished "The Forgotten Highlander" by Alistair Urquhart. He was a young man (19? ) when WWII broke out in Europe. His family was comforted that previously the UK had called up people in alphabetical order. They must have started at the other end for WWII. He was stationed in Singapore, and was there when they surrendered. He spent the next five or six years as a Japanese POW. He worked on the Bridge on the River Kwai, and was at Nagasaki when the bomb went off.

I think he went into reasonable detail in the beginning to establish who he was. The detail of the time in the camps is amazing. When he wrote the book, at age 90, he had not forgiven the Japanese, or the British War Department. He does not go into much detail about his life after the war, except the first maybe year at home. He fought the War Department, tried to put his life back together, and struggled with acclimatization to a normal life. Then he gets really vague.

The story is his wartime experience, the evil of the Japanese, and the ill-treatment at the hands of the War Department, of all who had been POWs. It is a riveting story of courage and strength.
Yesterday at 22:45 EST .

   5 people like this.



   Gram77  This sounds like a book I want to read. Thanks for the review.
Yesterday at 09:49 EST .

  8 people like this.



   MeiDei  I worked (in the 80's ) with a Dutchman who as a young man was in the spice trade in Asia & also imprisoned several years by the Japanese doing hard labor. He never spoke much about it other than to marvel at dealing with them 40 years later with his renewed side-line spice business.
22 hours ago .

  4 people like this.





   StormCnter  I'm slogging through "Covenant" by Michener. As with many of his books, it's riveting in parts and eye-glazing in others. I'm determined to finish it.
Sunday at 07:42 EST .

   4 people like this.



   Balogreene  I love Michener, but, have the same problem. His books are often picked up, put down, picked up again. Covenant is in my library, but, I haven't even started it yet.
Yesterday at 22:48 EST .

  4 people like this.



   MeiDei  Wait til you get to the part of how, at the end, they got into government & law making. It made me think of who writes our laws vs. who votes them in without reading first. Some frustrating mindsets.
22 hours ago .

  4 people like this.





   Gram77  Anyone reading or has read the latest Jack Reacher novel? It's really good and lo and behold, Reacher has developed a bit of a sense of humor in this book.
November 15 at 08:21 EST .

   9 people like this.



   Gram77  Finished my book and guess what.....there were several head butts.
November 21 at 12:36 EST .

  4 people like this.





   RoseOfTexas  Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty: hadn't heard of this author but read a short description on a bestseller list & thought I would give it a try. Loved it! Wittily written drama takes place in & around an Australian elementary school. Loved so many of the characters & the ending was great.
November 8 at 23:53 EST .

   10 people like this.



   RoseOfTexas  Gone Girl (coming out as a movie & I'm just now getting around to reading the book ): I didn't like either of the main characters but slogged through this book to the bitter (& disappointing ) end. I didn't exactly enjoy it, but it was a clever concept IMO & I will probably see the movie to see how true to the book it is.
November 8 at 23:58 EST .

  12 people like this.



   Gram77  Read Gone Girl and when finished felt like tossing it into the street! I think (as so often they do ) the end will be changed for the movie. Just my opinion.
November 9 at 09:16 EST .

  9 people like this.



   ControlFreak  I read Big Little Lies and enjoyed it, too.
November 9 at 19:11 EST .

  7 people like this.



   StormCnter  I'll put "Little Big Lies" on my book order list.
Sunday at 07:40 EST .

  4 people like this.





   StormCnter  I got my new shipment of books in and decided to begin with Mark Costello's "Big If". It was published in 2002 and I thought it is timely because it involves the Secret Service protection of a threatened Vice-President. It's fiction. Has anyone read it?
October 18 at 07:49 EST .

   8 people like this.



   RoseOfTexas  Sounds like 1 I would like...how did you like it?
November 8 at 23:50 EST .

  12 people like this.



   StormCnter  I apologize for not responding sooner. I don't get to this Wall very often, obviously. I liked "Big If". There are many twists in it and it's an enjoyable read.
Sunday at 07:40 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Balogreene  I want to push this back to the top. Storm recommended The Martian: A Novel by Weir. Oh my, get it! It is an absolutely wonderful book. I did read some reviews that he made scientific errors, but, I'm not a chemist, mechanical engineer, botanist, whatever. It is an almost perfect book. It is available on Kindle Unlimited, for rent if you have Prime, or most probably at your local library. It is an easy read (don't let that science stuff scare you ). And, I got choked up a couple of times.
October 10 at 16:43 EST .

   18 people like this.



   Gram77  I'm glad to see this book getting some action. I had mentioned it quite a while ago and it didn't get any comments. It hasn't gotten into my library yet and I find that odd.
October 11 at 10:07 EST .

  15 people like this.



   StormCnter  Gram, your librarians might not know about it. It's been pretty much an underground book, not a big publisher and not a recognized author. Andy Weir offered the book for free from his website after no agent would represent him. Then, after he got a bit of attention, he got it on Amazon for Kindle at 99 cents. Now the book is on the NYT's best-selling list. Try mentioning it to your library and then, if you want, you can ask about donating a copy.
October 12 at 08:08 EST .

  18 people like this.



   Gram77  Donate I can do. Sometimes when I read a book that I am really taken with and I keep it and have been known to read it again.
October 12 at 14:12 EST .

  19 people like this.



   MeiDei  What I especially licked about the book was the author's style of writing.
October 12 at 19:10 EST .

  13 people like this.



   MeiDei  that should be liked, not licked - dang 'c' key
October 13 at 16:32 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Balogreene  I loved the stuff on Mars, and sometimes got bored with the stuff on Earth. But, I loved his style. I hope he writes more Andy Weir is good.
October 13 at 19:09 EST .

  14 people like this.





   StormCnter  I know I've recommended on this thread an old book, Richard Harwell's "Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind Letters". Today, in the Wall Street Journal, I read a review of a similar, but brand new GWTW book, "The Scarlett Letters", edited by John Wiley, Jr. I am intrigued and I will order it, but I wonder if there won't be a tremendous overlap. Wiley is apparently a respected GWTW expert and historian, so we'll see.
October 4 at 13:47 EST .

   16 people like this.




   Susannah  For those of you who are fans of Hilary Mantel, author of Wolf Hall, she has a brand-new collection of short stories out. It's called "The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher," though I'm under the impression the only reference in the entire book to Thatcher is tangential.

I've never read anything by Mantel, so I can't offer a personal recommendation here.
October 1 at 12:02 EST .

   16 people like this.



   StormCnter  I've read two of her books and they were good ones. I've always been interested in Tudor England and particularly enjoyed "Wolf Hall".
October 2 at 07:20 EST .

  14 people like this.



   MeiDei  BBC is making Wolf Hall into a series with Damian Lewis - here's a link to the story: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/art
icle-2790697/pressure-heats-damian-lewis
-author-hilary-mantel-warns-bbc-not-turn
-tv-version-wolf-hall-nonsense.html
October 13 at 19:07 EST .

  16 people like this.





   MeiDei  Has anyone else read "Flight of the Sparrow" by Amy Belding Brown? I just finished it. It's an historical novel about a real person, Mary Rowlandson, who was captured by Indians and ransomed back to the English during the 17th century in Massachusetts.
October 1 at 03:08 EST .

   20 people like this.



   StormCnter  I haven't read it, hadn't heard of it, Mei, but it sure sounds intriguing.
October 2 at 07:21 EST .

  11 people like this.



   MeiDei  The irony is Massasoit shared food & seeds with the Pilgrims when they landed in Plimoth & taught them to hunt & fish & grow their crops. Without his help they would have starved. In return they took his lands, nearly wiped out the Indians with European disease. His son, King Phillip aware of this rebelled. It is intriguing - many Indians converted to Christianity and were termed Praying Indians with land areas assigned to them ... then came the injustices. It's the sad story of "the more things change, the more they stay the same". I think you would enjoy the book, & like me be glad we weren't Puritan women in those days : )
October 2 at 12:01 EST .

  13 people like this.



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