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Recipes



   Wrightwinger  We had an Easter dinner/ egg hunt at church today and my Wife made a corn casserole that seemed to be a hit. We didn't bring any home.

The recipe is below, but we added a chopped sautéed-in-butter onion to the recipe.

Corn Casserole

1 (15oz ) can whole kernel corn, drained
1 (15oz ) can cream-style corn
1 package Jiffy corn muffin mix (8 oz. )
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup butter, melted
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese or your favorite

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. mix all ingredients, minus the cheese, together and pour into a greased baking dish. After the casserole has baked for 45 minutes, or is set in the middle and golden brown, sprinkle with cheddar and put it back in the oven. Let the cheese melt, take the casserole out and enjoy this ridiculously buttery dish.

www.ohmygoodygoodness.com
April 19 at 16:43 EST .

   1 person like this.



   Balogreene  That sounds really good. Much better than the creamier, soupier versions. I bet the Jiffy mix makes a huge difference. I'm adding this to my list.
April 19 at 19:55 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Balogreene  Did anyone see a posting of food from the 40s, 50s, and 60s that made the rounds a few months ago? Most of it looked pretty bad, but my mom did make the lime jello, pineapple, cottage cheese salad. There was also this three layer sandwich loaf, "frosted" with a mix of mayo and sour cream. Mom said her cousin made it for her wedding shower in 1948. It had egg salad, tuna salad, and ham salad. We all said yuck! Now, looking more deeply into my Swedish heritage, and using Rosetta Stone to learn Swedish, I learned that loaf is a smorgastarta, traditionally made with salmon, cucumbers and herbs, and beautifully decorated. Here is a recipe for a vegetarian version I want to make next weekend. I may even make a Swedish rye for the bread.

An international selection of vegetarian sandwich spreads take on a Nordic flair in this delightful smörgåstårta co-created by home chef and cookbook editor extraordinaire Margrit Meinel Diehl and Kari Diehl.

Ingredients:

For the artichoke spread:
1 14-ounce can artichokes, coarsely chopped
1 cup freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano (about 2 ounces good Italian parmesan )
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 large garlic clove, mashed
.
For the Hungarian liptauer spread:
1 cup Quark or cottage cheese
2/3 cup softened cream cheese
1/4 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
3 tsp. sweet Hungarian paprika
3/4 tsp. dry mustard
1 tsp. caraway seeds
2 Tbsp. finely minced onion
2 Tbsp. coarsely chopped capers
.
For the spinach spread:
1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach
1/2 cup softened cream cheese
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. ground sage
.
For the smörgåstårta “frosting”:
1 cup softened cream cheese
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup crème fraiche or sour cream
.
16 slices sandwich-style French or white bread (the bread needs to be fairly firm, with some texture to it. )
Cucumber slices, sweet pepper slices, quartered cherry tomatoes, sliced olives, capers, and summer savory for garnish
Preparation:

The day before serving (if possible, since this intensifies the flavors ):

Make your three vegetable spreads.

For the artichoke spread: Fold together the chopped artichokes, grated parmesan, mayonnaise, and mashed garlic.

For the Hungarian liptauer spread: In a food processor, combine together the Quark / cottage cheese, softened cream cheese, and butter. When blended to spread consistency, pulse in the paprika, mustard, and caraway seeds (Note: if the spread seems too thin, add additional cream cheese in 1/4-cup increments until it reaches a spreadable consistency ). Using a spatula, fold the minced onion and chopped capers into the spread.

For the spinach spread: Cook the spinach according to directions on package; drain well. Combine with softened cream cheese, salt, pepper, and sage.

To construct the smörgåstårta:

Slice the crusts off of the bread. Arrange four slices in a square pattern on a serving plate; thinly butter this bottom layer. Cover completely with the spinach spread.

Thinly butter the bottoms of four more bread slices, then place on top of the spinach layer. Thinly butter the tops of the slices. Cover completely with the Hungarian liptauer spread.

Thinly butter the bottoms of four more bread slices, then place on top of the liptauer spread. Thinly butter the tops of the slices. Cover completely

   April 19 at 14:01 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Balogreene  Cover completely with the artichoke spread. Thinly butter the bottoms of the final four slices and place on top of the artichoke layer.

If possible, cover the smörgåstårta with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. If not possible, refrigerate for at least three hours to allow the flavors to blend (it will still taste fabulous! ).

One hour before serving, whisk together the cream cheese, mayonnaise, and crème fraiche / sour cream. Frost the top and sides of the smörgåstårta. Then, use your creativity to arrange vegetable slices, olives, capers, and fresh herbs into a striking pattern (one of the hallmarks of the smörgåstårta, as well as of Scandinavian food in general, is that it should be as bright and attractive to the eye as to the taste! ).

Yield: serves 20 as part of a smorgasbord table.
April 19 at 14:04 EST .

  2 people like this.



   BirdsNest  My mother made a lemon/lime jello salad that had chopped celery, cottage cheese, grated carrot, and I think pineapple-been a LONG time since I had it and don't have the recipe.It was MY FAVORITE.
April 19 at 15:54 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Balogreene  Bird, my mom made that too! Jello salad was so much more than just jello. We still make one with cranberry juice (cooked from cranberries, not bought ), gelatin, celery and walnuts. The dressing is Miracle whip and sour cream blended together. My Favorite.
April 19 at 19:58 EST .

 1 person like this.



   BirdsNest  Yum! I love cranberries, we make our own whole berry cranberry sauce...Care to share the above recipe????
April 19 at 20:45 EST .

  4 people like this.



   Balogreene  I'll find it and post it tomorrow. It's one of those things you think you know by heart, but probably don't.
April 19 at 23:28 EST .

  2 people like this.





   BirdsNest  Stromboli....I had never eaten any til about a week ago. It really is good and I cannot believe it is something I was not familiar with. I have made one with just meat and cheese, marinara on the side for dipping. I want to make one with the sauce inside, meat,cheese,artichoke hearts,and black olives.
April 17 at 10:18 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Balogreene  I love Stromboli, I was introduced to it in NYC. Looks relatively easy to make.
April 19 at 14:07 EST .

  2 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Very easy, Balo. Roll out pizza dough, put filling ingredients (meats,cheese,tomato sauce if desired and cooked or roasted veggies )in the middle to within an inch of the edge, roll one side over top the filling, then add more ingredients the same way, pull the dough from the other side and seal, placing the seam side down.Place on an oil rubbed baking sheet, brush the top of the dough with olive oil and cut 3 slits for steam to escape. Bake 25 min at 450F. I usually put a piece of foil on the top about halfway through the baking to keep the top from browning too much. I like to serve with sauce for dipping. I think one with roasted veggies would be delicious,too.
April 19 at 16:00 EST .

  5 people like this.



   BirdsNest  It re-heats well. The one I made with artichokes and olives was not as good the second day as the one with just meat and cheese.Pepperoni is "the bomb" in it also!! I also think I would like one made with a thin smear of pesto before lining the meats on top. What do you think?
April 19 at 16:04 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Balogreene  Pesto, for sure. Another thing I might try is some of that olive mixture you put on Muffalettas. I'm not sure what it's called, but it's got green and black olives, oil, onions, garlic, mom buys it to eat with crackers or with cream cheese on a sandwich.
April 19 at 20:02 EST .

  3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  I could eat that stuff right out of the jar, it is so good. It would be good on a hockey puck... I have never had a real honest to goodness Muffalatta sandwich, but I am sure I would like it.
April 19 at 20:50 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Nugoddess  Looking for a different way to serve pancakes for breakfast? Try the Bisquik pancake bites. http://www.bettycrocker.com/how-to/tipslibrary/baking-tips/h
ow-to-make-bisquick-pancake-bites


Soooooo good and kids love them!

   April 10 at 17:44 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Yottyhere  Yum! Imma going to try the bacon cheddah cheese ones.
Can you freeze them I wonder?
April 10 at 22:08 EST .

  4 people like this.



   Nugoddess  Ayup! Made some this morning and froze the 'dovers.
April 11 at 13:29 EST .

 1 person like this.





   StormCnter  One of my kitchen peeves is when the boiled eggs get greenish around the yolk. Yes, there are suggestions for preventing this and some of them work. But, I saw a household tip this morning saying it's easier to steam eggs than to boil them. And the result is green-free. Has anyone ever tried this? The site said 10-12 minutes over a couple of inches of boiling water is sufficient. I wonder if it works for a large batch, say a dozen?
April 2 at 16:08 EST .

   5 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Just make sure you don't boil the pan dry. Years ago when we had a vegetable steamer, I used it mostly for eggs and the result was a tender egg. It took 20 minutes if I remember correctly and I do not remember having any green eggs, ever. I would guess if the pot was large enough and you had a large enough colander to place over top as long as the eggs weren't piled on top of one another it should be alright. I wonder if the bamboo steamer would work for this?? I may try it.
April 2 at 17:13 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  thanks!
April 2 at 18:05 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Balogreene  I bake mine. Half an hour at 350. Straddle them over the "muffin cups" on a mini muffin pan.

I have to admit, I don't think eggs are done until they have the green around the edge, I like my eggs HARD. I actually bake them more like 45 minutes to an hour. Just like I put the eggs in water, bring it to a boil, and simmer them for an hour.

Mom doesn't really want the green ring, but doesn't do them herself, so just laughs at me.

My Sis just bought a NuWave oven, and they supposedly hard-cook eggs. I'm going to try it next.
April 2 at 20:22 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Surfhut  One of my favorite veggies is asparagus, which is in season and at the lowest price of the year right now at my local store. I usually roast the spears with a little olive oil and sea salt, sometimes with crushed garlic, then splash them with a little lemon juice when they are hot out of the oven. Sometimes grate a little Parmesan cheese on them after they have roasted.

I have a rice salad recipe that includes asparagus. I'll post it if anyone is interested. Do any of you have some good asparagus recipes?

Oh my ... smoked salmon, baguettes, roasted asparagus. I'm hungry!
March 29 at 14:03 EST .

   7 people like this.



   Nugoddess  Surfie, if you really like asparagus (and who doesn't? ) Anne Burrell has a killer recipe for asparagus, pecorino, and red onion:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/anne-
burrell/asparagus-pecorino-and-red-onion
-salad-recipe.html
March 29 at 17:47 EST .

  4 people like this.



   Surfhut  I have her cookbook and forgot this recipe is in it. The reviews online say it's even better the next day. So I'm making it today and will have leftovers for lunch tomorrow. Thanks for the reminder, Nu!
March 30 at 08:20 EST .

  3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Asparagus, from Mexico is $3.98/lb here.
March 30 at 09:57 EST .

  5 people like this.



   HopeandGlory  Here in South Central Texas Hubby and I are eating our third harvest of asparagus of the season. We're eating it steamed with garlic salt a little pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice . . . good eating.
April 1 at 18:09 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Surfhut  I've been paying $1.27/lb for USA asparagus. Can't get enough of it!
April 2 at 20:20 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Balogreene  Back when I got $10,000 of bonuses a year, I stopped at Wegmann's on my way home from work. I would buy their pre-made crab cakes with dill dressing and a pound of asparagus. They both went in the oven for a few minutes (asparagus roasted with a little olive oil and a little balsamic ). One of my favorite dinners!
April 2 at 20:24 EST .

  4 people like this.





   BirdsNest  Oh my....baguettes

http://food52.com/blog/10044-dan-leader-s-4-hour-baguette

Reading the instructions, this seems like a cakewalk....anybody want to try it??
March 26 at 18:14 EST .

   10 people like this.



   Flaming Sword  Baked my first baguette many years ago. There is no other bread that's as good, fresh from the oven. But it goes stale in a microsecond. Either bake only what you'll eat that day, or plan to have pain perdu and bread pudding in your immediate future.
March 29 at 18:41 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Surfhut  Bread baking has always intimidated me. This looks so easy, I might actually be able to bake this successfully. Will give it a try. Thanks, Bird.
March 30 at 08:33 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Balogreene  Surf, don't let bread-baking intimidate you. Laurel's kitchen so taught me how to do it. And one of their newer bread books has better instructions. In the olden days (1970s ) healthy whole-grain, homemade bread didn't rise very well. It tasted great, but it was heavy. Laurel and friends have since learned better methods. The bread is lighter and rises higher. It also takes more time, but it is good.

You know, as the dough rises for an hour, you do something else. I usually cook something else on my weekend cooking list. But, there is always dusting, vacuuming, etc.
April 2 at 20:30 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Flaming Sword  I'm looking for smoked salmon recipes. I'm mad about the stuff. I generally end up layering a toasted English muffin (better than bagels ) with cream cheese, sliced red onion and as much smoked salmon as I can make it hold and still fit into my mouth. Then there's a savory smoked salmon cheesecake. I'd like more options. Got some? But the salmon cannot be overwhelmed by other ingredients. I want to taste that delicious stuff in every bite.
March 23 at 17:28 EST .

   8 people like this.



   JoniTx  This herb butter recipe is absolutely delicious with smoked salmon; love it on slightly toasted French baguette slices. Give it a try:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-g
arten/smoked-salmon-and-herb-butter-reci
pe.html#comments
March 24 at 16:43 EST .

  5 people like this.





   Wilarrbie  Ok, good cooks in Luciland. I am having company for St Pats and I have 2 pkg of corned beef. I COULD boil them as I always have, but looking for maybe cooking differently this time. Anyone have experience with the results of corned beef in a pressure cooker? Also, back in the Chicago area we could find corned beef that was made for roasting - but I haven't seen that much here in rural Mo. Can you roast a "point" cut even tho it says to boil it? How about crock pot? Thanks!
March 16 at 22:16 EST .

   8 people like this.



   Surfhut  I'm way late to answer in time to be helpful, but here's a link from Ree Drummond who bakes her corned beef:

http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2014/
03/corned-beef-and-cabbage/
March 17 at 20:06 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Wilarrbie  Thanks Surfhut. I compromised. Boiled the 2 pieces for a couple hours, THEN put in oven for a couple more til tender..they were pretty good - not too salty. Add horseradish and yum. Will be having sandwiches later in the week too! Like meatloaf - almost like the leftover sandwich better than the dinner meal!
March 18 at 00:38 EST .

  7 people like this.



   Ynaught  I'm even later, but I wanted to share this recipe that was the absolute best corned beef I have ever had. It is boiled then glazed and baked and sooo scrumptious from the glaze!
http://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-c
ourse/beef/glazed-corned-beef-cabbage-n.
html
March 20 at 10:23 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Kidsmom  I am later still, but maybe for next year...
Take the corned beef and cook in a crock pot. Put it in pot, with juices, water to cover, add the spice pack, and 1 T caraway seed. Cook on low 8-10 hrs (for 2.5 lb corned beef ). It is utterly delightful. Tender as can be and slices well. I strain fat off of the juice and use it to flavor my cabbage. YUM!
March 23 at 14:47 EST .

  4 people like this.



   Kidsmom  Correction on above; I use the juice, not the fat, to flavor the cabbage : )
March 24 at 06:46 EST .

  3 people like this.





   Linder  Have been happily buying pkgs of shredded cheese for years until recently hearing one of my favorite tv chefs say they are inferior products....should shred your own. Am now doing that and of course, he was right.
March 15 at 10:46 EST .

   9 people like this.



   BirdsNest  The pre-shredded kind is tossed with corn starch to keep the pieces separated, at least that's what I was told.
March 16 at 08:57 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Surfhut  Please don't ever buy Parmesan in a can or shredded package. Get the real thing. When you get down to the end of the parm wedge, throw it into a pot of soup. You can also freeze it and throw it into a soup or sauce later.
March 16 at 14:00 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Gerty  Have always shredded my own. Kitchen Aid has a great attachment for such a chore.
March 20 at 23:13 EST .

  4 people like this.



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