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Nostalgia



   MeiDei  REMEMBER WHEN -

?Sadly - the 2nd paragraph is no longer in practice today - think Little Sisters of the Poor, Hobby Lobby, Military Chaplains kept from visiting the sick or wounded, a baker, a photographer...... speech is limited by PC, dissent is called racism, etc., and our government operates beyond the limits of our Constitution - who would have guessed it 30 years ago? We can still travel freely as long as no criminal flash mobs, or paid protestors are blocking roads or buildings - or setting cars on fire over a real, or perceived, slight magnified by false news reports - as has been said "let no crisis go to waste". I'll try to live his parting sentiment, I fear I'm discouraged today. God bless you & may He have mercy on my soul.

Reagan 1985: 'Let Us Keep This Thanksgiving Day Sacred'
A transcript of Reagan’s Thanksgiving address in 1985:

“Good morning, everyone. You know, the Statue of Liberty and this wonderful holiday called Thanksgiving go together naturally because although as Americans we have many things for which to be thankful, none is more important than our liberty. Liberty: that quality of government, that brightness of mind and spirit for which the Pilgrim Fathers braved the seas and Americans for two centuries have laid down their lives.

“Today, while religion is suppressed in perhaps one third of the world, we Americans are free to worship the Almighty as we choose. While entire nations must endure the yoke of tyranny, we are free to speak our minds, to enjoy an unfettered and vigorous press, and to make government abide by the limits we deem just. While millions live behind walls, we remain free to travel throughout the land to share this precious day with those we love most deeply – the members of our families.

“My fellow Americans, let us keep this Thanksgiving Day sacred. Let us thank God for the bounty and goodness of our nation. And as a measure of our gratitude, let us rededicate ourselves to the preservation of this: the land of the free and the home of the brave.

“From the Reagan family to your family: happy Thanksgiving and God bless you all.”
November 24 at 20:41 EST .

   4 people like this.




   Calvinesq  TV Dinners. I recall as a young child having my mom try Swanson TV Dinners as an experiment. You see, my mom was/is an excellent cook, so this was just that - an experiment. Well, she heated them up in the oven (conventional, of course ), and we sat in front of the TV while we ate them (something we were then otherwise not allowed to do ) - they were "TV" dinners, after all. The experiment was not a complete failure or a big success. I remember that the food was rather unexceptional, but being a picky eater, I liked how the foods (veggies, meat and potatoes ) each had their on separate compartment. Anyway, TV Dinners became very rare in my house, as my mom made much better, tastier food.
November 14 at 12:07 EST .

   3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Our experience was similar. The tv dinners were advertised as being quick and efficient and tasty. I seem to recall there were only two Swanson versions: one of sliced roast beef and one of fried chicken. My mother loved to experiment, so we tried them out and decided they were ok in a pinch, but probably weren't going to become very popular. Fortunately for the tv dinner industry, we were bad market predictors.
November 17 at 05:19 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  We tried them once - OK, but if your mother was a good cook you always had left-overs to look forward to - not so w/single serving meals. Today Swanson has a few good frozen dinners that are handy for one of "those" days; Café Steamers have a few good ones too - for a quick lunch.
November 19 at 22:19 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Rereading Calvin's post brought back a childhood memory. When I was preschool age my mom brought me to my paternal grandmother's; mom got her recipes from her that my father most liked. In my late teens, a newly married aunt was given recipes that her husband liked my his mother. My MIL hated cooking, her son had no favorites - good thing too!

I'm going to put together a little book of recipes for anyone tasked with cooking for my son, just seems like something that should be done.

And Cal, as a kid all our veggies/salads were served separately, I'm wondering if that was influenced by dad's years of service in the hotel industry; still do today to some extent.
November 19 at 22:54 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  My own sweet mother-in-law was just an ordinary cook, but her biscuits were wonderful. I spent many years trying to duplicate her biscuits, but never felt I succeeded. I made biscuits for almost every meal (3 per day ) for most of my marriage and I make excellent biscuits. But, hers were better.
November 22 at 06:30 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Suejeanne  I went on here to ask out loud about bayberry candles - I wonder if anyone knows of a catalog nowadays where one can order these - my Mother used to always have them at Christmas time - a dear friend used to always send them to her - where can one buy real, made in America, bayberry candles - the pillar type (shorter pillar, about 5 to 6 inches high, about 3 inches in diameter ) - not in a glass jar, not anything except that beautiful shade of green we remember - thank you in advance!
October 27 at 18:54 EST .

   3 people like this.



   Safetydude  You can start here: https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=bay
berry+candles.


Good luck.
October 27 at 21:25 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Gram77  There is a possibility that they may be available at the Vermont Country Store. You can find lots of stuff there that we remember as kids.
November 3 at 17:17 EST .

  3 people like this.





   StormCnter  When I was a pre-teen, I loved the Bobbsey Twins books. Some things puzzled me, however. "Watercress" wasn't something Texas kids had heard of, never mind gathering it from nearby waterways and what in the world was a "cruller"? But, the Bobbsey Twins were a big part of my reading life.

Can you name all four of them?
October 25 at 05:53 EST .

   3 people like this.



   Safetydude  Four twins?
Would that not be the 'Bobbsey Octuplets', or at least the 'Bobbsey Quadruplets'?
October 25 at 20:20 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gerty  I think Nan was one of them.
October 26 at 02:01 EST .

 1 person like this.



   StormCnter  Ah, SD, you weren't a Bobbsey Twins reader, I assume. Maybe it was a girl thing.
Yes, Gerty, Nan was one of them.
October 26 at 04:54 EST .

 1 person like this.



   MeiDei  You had to mention 'cruller' - a French Cruller is a taste of heaven - light and sweet glazed with milk & honey! Now I have a just-researched recipe for them - my weight gaining days may be over!
October 26 at 11:22 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Long enough on this one. There were two sets of twins, Bert and Nan were the older set, Freddie and Flossie the younger.
October 26 at 17:18 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Suejeanne  just now saw this - remembered Freddie and Flossie, that it was two sets of twins - I was thinking the older twins were Ben and Mary! My little brother and I named various landmarks in our childhood semi-rural environment after various Bobbsey Twin stories - good grief - one was "Mystery Mansion" which was an ancient-looking unused aviary surrounded by wisteria vines
October 27 at 18:49 EST .

 1 person like this.



   StormCnter  And, after we all were a bit older, there were the Nancy Drew books. The only person I knew who had a complete set was a boy. He generously shared.
November 8 at 08:23 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter  How many of you were adept at the Bunny Hop?




October 24 at 07:18 EST .

   4 people like this.



   Gerty  Shades of the '50s !
October 26 at 02:03 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  The Bunny Hop was a staple at our Homecoming dances in those years.
October 26 at 04:55 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter  Did you ever have a slingshot? Yes, I know there was another term for them, at least in Texas, but my parents forbade that term. My dad used to make them for us using strong twigs and strips of innertube. We had fierce chinaberry fights. Green chinaberries are the best ammo, of course, and will leave a lingering mark on vulnerable skin.
October 5 at 07:26 EST .

   3 people like this.



   MeiDei  spitballs indoors ..... ; )

boomerangs right after WWII were popular, souvenirs brought back by returning soldiers.
October 5 at 13:10 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Calvinesq  Yes. I used hard dried peas as ammunition. Tried to shoot Blue Jays raiding nests of other birds. Never got close, but scared a few away.
October 5 at 15:32 EST .

  2 people like this.



   GO3  A lot of my friends had slingshots but a lot also preferred BB guns. My favorite was a replica .45 pistol that shot BBs, pellets, or small darts c. late 50s.

http://www.armslist.com/posts/381199/col
umbia-south-carolina-handguns-for-sale--
vintage-marksman-bb-pistol-w-original-bo
x
October 5 at 23:40 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  My brothers had BB guns, too. I think most little boys had them in those days. One of my brothers' Red Ryder, circa 1948, was sent for repair a few years ago when it was brought out of storage. The Daisy factory returned it repaired and refurbished and refused to charge for the work.
October 6 at 06:35 EST .

  2 people like this.



   GO3  Nice!
October 6 at 10:31 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  My son has a Daisy air rifle - early 1980's ... shortly after they were banned here and ammo disappeared. He used tin cans as targets, & to scare hungry squirrels away from the birds nests.
October 6 at 12:20 EST .

  2 people like this.



   HopeandGlory  For those interested . . . Here's a useless piece of trivia . . . In England Slingshots are called Catapults . . . Smile!
October 29 at 22:37 EST .

  2 people like this.





   StormCnter  When I read about France banning all plastic dinnerware and utensils, I was wondering how many French kitchens still have a piece or two of Melmac in the cabinets. Remember Melmac?
   September 18 at 05:01 EST .

   3 people like this.



   MeiDei  My grandmother had a few pieces at one time - I have one labeled "Melamine" - from Disney, a Mickey mouse plate : ) about 31+ years old.
September 18 at 08:51 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Oh, I had a complete set of Melmac in my early married days. So did every woman I knew. But, as sturdy as those dishes were, over time, they stained and scarred and were finally sent to Goodwill.
September 18 at 09:22 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Gram77  My mother had a full set plus all the extra pieces and over the years it showed where we had marks where we cut meat. While on vacation I went to a huge flea market and I saw tons of Melmac. Not my thing.
October 2 at 16:40 EST .

  2 people like this.





   GO3  Playground circa 1900. This was back when American kids grew up to be real men and real women without the influences of hand wringers and SJWs.
   September 7 at 01:15 EST .

   5 people like this.



   Gram77  Right On! All my grandkids do hold something and use 2 thumbs.
What ever happened and hide and seek and hop scotch and riding all over the neighborhood on bicycles?
September 7 at 13:38 EST .

  2 people like this.



   GO3  Not imparting values to kids, allowing perverts to get away with their horrendous acts, hand wringers as parents, letting MDs have more influence than they should, video games etc. all contributed to empty neighborhoods after school. Sad.
September 7 at 22:27 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Anyone else remember see-saws? The favorite game was to get someone up in the air on that long board and then jump off. No playground has them any more.
September 9 at 08:36 EST .

  2 people like this.



   GO3  Yeah, I remember see-saws (me wincing ).
September 10 at 09:05 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  My brother liked to get me up in the air and then jump off - sharing a wince! How about sliding down an aluminum (? ) slide after it's been overly warmed by the sun - sharing the burn anyone : )?
September 13 at 09:58 EST .

  2 people like this.



   GO3  For the slides in the summer, we would just curl up our legs a little so our cut offs were the only thing touching the metal.
September 15 at 02:28 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  My brothers and I used to slide down the tin roof of the calf barn. But, you had to keep your toes tucked in, or they would get sliced in the edge of the next overlapping sheet of metal. After we rolled our youngest brother down that roof inside a tractor tire, our mother put a stop to the whole business. We thought we had killed him.
September 15 at 09:20 EST .

  4 people like this.





   FlatCityGirl  Vintage "swamp cooler" on 1950 Chevrolet
   August 15 at 08:58 EST .

   2 people like this.




   GO3  Here's one for the ages. I must have gone through a ton of these Pez dispensers as a kid. On the left is a traditional Tweety Bird one and on the right a newer Alien dispenser.
   August 15 at 06:14 EST .

   2 people like this.


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