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Nostalgia



   Ole buzzard  This is the Titan my Dad was standing behind in the picture below. Yes, people really used to farm with this! This machine probably replaced 15 or 20 horses. What this tractor used to do in a 12 hour day is now done in 1 hour by a modern tractor. The big silver box is the radiator for the two cylinder internal combustion engine.
   January 23 at 13:51 EST .

   3 people like this.




   Ole buzzard  Somehow I misplaced the CD with all my pictures of the steam shows my Dad and brothers used to go to. Fortunately, I had uploaded them to Facebook, so they are not lost permanently. This is a picture of my Dad standing at the back end of a Titan kerosene fueled traction engine. It was similar in appearance to a steam traction engine, but used a water cooled internal combustion engine, and was built by the International Harvester Company. He is about 85 years old in this picture.
   January 23 at 13:46 EST .

   3 people like this.




   Ole buzzard  Bettijo's post below got me thinking about how my Dad, my brothers, and I used to go to several farm steam power shows every summer. There would be steam traction engines of every size and make powering threshers, plows, grain binders and all other manner of farm machinery. We kept going to these even after he got into his nineties. I like to think that it kept him young.
   January 12 at 15:00 EST .

   15 people like this.




   Bettijo  





Published on Aug 16, 2014
The Great Dorset Steam Fair WW1 commemorative convoy from Bovington Camp to Tarrant Hinton, on 16th August 2014, arrives at the roundabout in front of the Bryanston School Gates - just before Blandford Bridge. A vintage (Ford? ) staff car forms the escort at the front. McLaren road locomotive 1332, Gigantic, then appears hauling the 72 ton Pickfords trailer bearing the 1914 WWI Holt 75 HP gun tractor, 'Ben'. The strain of turning the Pickfords trailer through ninety degrees gives Gigantic cause to slow down and then bounce forward with accompanying chuffs as the driver expertly brings the trailer around. McLaren road locomotive 1652, Boadicea, pushes from the rear making up the 80 foot train. Burrell road locomotive 3257, Clinker, follows bringing troops. Roger, son of the late Fred Dibnah, is (I believe ) at the controls of the 1917 Foden steam lorry that follows. Roger is co-owner of the Holt tractor. Show co-founder, Ronald Harris is with his 1915 Daimler lorry which was army owned in the war. The rear is brought up by the 1918 GMC water bowser owned by Rowley Moors of Bridport. After a stop for sandwiches at the Crown Hotel you will see the lead driver check that all are ready, a blast of the whistles to signal the start and then the convoy setting off for the final leg of the journey. Please comment with any further information / corrections and don't forget to tick on 'Like' if you enjoyed this video. I was lucky with the shots/light and think that I caught the vehicles at their active best - especially the early sequence showing Gigantic being turned around the roundabout. All credit to those who have restored these vehicles and who handled them so well. It was a truly spectacular and memorable event.
   January 3 at 13:44 EST .

   17 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  Steam traction engines like these were designed primarily to be used as stationary power for for threshers, sawmills, grist mills and the like. Road transport was usually done at a lower throttle setting, which in turn leads to the leaping of the engine through turns.
January 4 at 17:38 EST .

  9 people like this.



   StormCnter  In my attic is a complete miniature steam-powered machine shop mounted on a 3'x 3' board. My son received it as a gift when he was about 12, old enough to operate the steam engine and to enjoy the action. His father had (has ) a modern manufacturing facility. Are kids introduced to steam in that way any more? My brothers had little steam engines, too.
January 8 at 07:52 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  One of the sons-in-law has one of those little steam engines. It is alcohol fired (i had one years ago, too, but it was electric ) and still works. It holds about a pint of water, and doesn't take long at all to get up a full head of steam.

I doubt that children are even introduced to steam locomotion in school anymore, despite the important part it played in the development of this country.
January 12 at 14:53 EST .

  5 people like this.





   MsHope  Remember when two extremely bright and witty gals posted daily on the Coffee Klatch wall with not only stories about an amazing dog named Mabel, but other tales that had us running to our computers first thing daily? I do ... (Sigh )
December 29 at 10:37 EST .

   17 people like this.



   MeiDei  Yes. I wish them a Happy New Year!
December 29 at 19:38 EST .

  13 people like this.



   NotaBene  Oh yes, I remember those two Ldotters and also a third one that wrote very good posts and talked about her life in the barn. I miss the three of them very much. Hope they are all doing well and as MeiDei Said I also wish them a Happy New Year too.
January 1 at 13:32 EST .

  13 people like this.



   Linder  I'm on board....wishing them a Happy New Year!
January 1 at 21:47 EST .

  9 people like this.





   Safetydude  Remember when ?
   December 16 at 22:10 EST .

   20 people like this.



   NotaBene  Those were the days!!
January 1 at 13:33 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  Would that we could get anybody even close !!!!
January 4 at 17:40 EST .

  12 people like this.





   Bettijo  The land that made me, me

http://www.youtube.com/embed/J55S38xwxnQ?rel=0
December 16 at 08:36 EST .

   19 people like this.



   Bettijo  Somebody please tell me what I am doing wrong. My YouTubes are not embedding.

Do watch this. You will love it.
December 16 at 08:37 EST .

  15 people like this.



   MeiDei  Well that was fun, & for a change the sound worked for me.
December 16 at 19:38 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Balogreene  loved it.
December 18 at 22:17 EST .

  16 people like this.



   Escaped commieny  take out 'embed'
Loved it and sent it out to others, so true
December 23 at 00:39 EST .

  11 people like this.





   MeiDei  Anyone want to share their best, or worst, Christmas - or both?
December 3 at 23:00 EST .

   21 people like this.

 View all 11 comments.




   Escaped commieny  Our Christmas's were filled with family and a special Christmas Eve Polish Holy Supper then midnight Mass. We had a five foot tall Santa ( Aunt Bettie ) stocking filled with trinkets, and practical stuff like socks. sweaters, school clothes and then there was that
special gift, we had always wanted! Then one year, I was about 7, missed the whole thing, with the Flu. Last year, my brother's pregnant daughter was hospitalized with a high fever, her husband and parents spent the time at the hospital, so I got to watch his zoo,(they live next door ) so we all ended up with the flu. What goes around, comes around, even if it takes 50 years. This year we have Ian and now little Eli, hopefully no bugs, and just fun.
December 4 at 10:09 EST .

  18 people like this.



   MeiDei  You brought back memories as a young adult, in MA, of my maternal grandmother's Christmas Eve suppers. On Christmas day she brought out the blessed Host(s ) (that her sister the nun in Poland sent every year ) & each in turn around the tables broke off a piece & gave their thanks to God, their love for each and about something particular to them that year. Even with the extra tables we still ate in shifts - even the kids table. You mentioned a zoo EC - Have you read The Zookeeper's Wife (? ) I think you'd enjoy it.

When I was in HS in NY it was usual for our group of friends to start early in the day & go from house to house decorating each others trees, with treats provided by the parents. Then we'd go back, light the trees & the various groups would meet for Midnight Mass which concluded with a Christmas pageant that included costumed 3 wise men riding real camels, a donkey, some shepherds & sheep - compliments of the Brooklyn Zoo I think (disposable runners provided in the aisles ), to meet at an altar to complete the live nativity scene. It was marvelous. Opening presents came after.
December 4 at 11:06 EST .

  18 people like this.



   Escaped commieny  Yes the Christmas Host are a legacy from the past: Wigilia/Villa/Kucios- the Vigil of Christmas eve. This ancient ritual unites past with present, this is the holiest of all the nights of the year in the Polish,Slovak and Lithuanian home. ( My brother's zoo is two pit bulls, two cats and a fish tank )I have an address to get Christmas wafers, since my Polish relatives and parents are gone. I will check to see if my email is on the mother ship.
December 4 at 17:18 EST .

  16 people like this.



   Escaped commieny  Just checked and my email is available. EC
December 4 at 17:28 EST .

  14 people like this.



   MeiDei  Just to clarify EC - the book mentioned is about a zoo in Poland during the war and it's underground activities under the noses of the Nazis. She even sheltered Irena Sandler very briefly.
December 4 at 17:59 EST .

  16 people like this.



   Escaped commieny  I will check Amazon for the book, sounds great. My grandfather gave Franz Joseph a horse to escape. My brain isn't working, have a wounded Beaglie and a husband in a leg brace with Orthopedic surgeon tomorrow. The country line kept changing from Poland to Austria, so had relatives in both. Thanks
December 4 at 18:56 EST .

  16 people like this.



   Balogreene  When I was 11, I was too old for dolls, but wanted a Thumbelina doll more than anything, so did Susy, my neighbor. Us kids waited at the top of the stairs, while mom and dad checked that Santa had come (my youngest sister was 5 ). As always, daddy handed out the gifts. We were all done, and I had not gotten my Thumbelina. I hurt. Then, mom told dad to look behind the tree, where the cousin gifts were, it looked like there might be a gift from Santa, that had gotten lost back there. It was my Thumbelina! Not 5 minutes later, Susy came over with hers, her parents had used the same ruse!
My favorite Christmas ever!
December 5 at 20:29 EST .

  10 people like this.



   Balogreene  I have another. When I was in college, I babysat for a couple I had been with for years. On Christmas Eve, they asked me to come to Christmas Eve Mass with them. I arrived at their house, with the very "chi chi, expensive" tree in the formal living room. The family, their best friends, and I went to Mass. After Mass we all went back to their house for a "drink". In the family room was a completely decorated tree, with gifts under it. Santa had been there, and we all opened the gifts.
I never figured out how they did it, and I never wanted to. It was magic. We left for church, and the tree wasn't there. We came back from church, and Santa had come and gone!
December 5 at 20:36 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Surfhut  Great post! I'll start with one of my best childhood memories. Mid-December, Saturday evening, Daddy and Mother loaded we 4 kids into the car in search of the perfect tree. It was always freezing cold, but our parents let us take our time until we found THE tree. We wanted to decorate as soon as we got home. NO! Daddy let us watch him make a fresh cut to the trunk, put it in a huge bucket of water in the garage so the tree could relax overnight. We could not put up the tree and decorate it until after church Sunday.

We got herded inside the house, parents turned on Disney, Daddy made hot chocolate from scratch and cinnamon toast while Mother got Sunday dinner ready.

When we got home from church on Sunday, there was a pot roast dinner or something else wonderful for the family to feast on while we kids had a blast decorating the tree.
December 5 at 20:41 EST .

  13 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Growing up, Christmas was the best for us. Both parents were dirt poor growing up and Mother wanted to make sure we all got plenty under the tree. She was good with a dollar, found deals all the time started shopping in October for gifts for 7 children. I don't remember a bad Christmas. We ALWAYS made trips to the woods for running cedar,tree boughs,and a Christmas tree. We made our own wreaths, Mother made wreaths for anyone that wanted one. Had a tree filled to bursting with old and new ornaments. Each year the boxes of decorations were brought out and unpacked-all the kids helped to decorate. Not the same with taking them down and re-packing, my brother R and I were the only ones who would take the care to pack it all up. I always loved the lights and the smells of Christmas. My aunt always made pizzelles and anise cookies to share with everyone. My sister and I helped her one year-she was a task master, my sister hated the whole experience. I was happy to be able to spend time with her, she was my favorite aunt.
December 7 at 18:30 EST .

  15 people like this.


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   Surfhut  I have a little down time this morning before the big feast. A Thanksgiving memory came to me out of the blue. When I was pretty young (probably 12 or so ), Mom told me to bring the pot of gravy from the stove to countertop so she could put it in gravy boats. It was an old pot with a wooden handle. The handle broke and the entire batch of gravy spilled onto the kitchen floor. Disaster! Somehow, Mom made more gravy while I cleaned up the floor. I have no idea how she did that.

Anybody have Thanksgiving mishap stories to share?
November 27 at 08:57 EST .

   20 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Our mothers were the original multi-taskers. Nothing was too tough to do for them. Hope some of the next generation will see the benefit of that.

The only Thanksgiving mishap for our family was the year my 16 year old brother crashed his trail bike into a telephone pole in our front yard. Dinner was forgotten while everyone piled into the car and went 30 miles to UVA hospital. He was seriously injured, but thanks to one gentleman on the rescue squad(he was a preacher ), instead of them taking him to the small hospital 10 miles away, he made the call to go to the bigger hospital. Pretty much saved his life, long time in hospital, much damage. We were thankful he survived, so that Christmas was extra special. He never appreciated the gift he got, the one of survival, but we did.
November 27 at 10:23 EST .

  16 people like this.



   Gram77  The usual kitchen commotion was going on and once the turkey was shoved into the oven everyone sat down with hot chocolate and talked about other Thanksgivings and family who had passed on. About 2 hours later mom checked the turkey and we heard a yelp to which she responded. "oh my goodness, I didn't turn on the oven!" We had our feast but much later. From then on every Thanksgiving we asked her if the oven was on. Nothing very serious but she sure got tired of that same old question.
November 29 at 08:08 EST .

  18 people like this.



   MeiDei  My aunt made a from-scratch steamed Holiday pudding that she put in the pressure cooker. We had to replace the kitchen ceiling. To this day, I won't touch a pressure cooker. Had a similar problem with those wax potpourri pellets in a little warming pot - have a ceiling that still has traces of wax & is a ** to get off. Threw that pot out!
November 30 at 22:25 EST .

  15 people like this.



   Balogreene  I grew up in a beautiful old farmhouse, we had family, friends, people from work, people from church every year. When I was a freshman in college, dad got transferred. We moved into a brand new house. The first Thanksgiving was just family (cousins lived down the road ). All of a sudden, as we sat down to dinner, there was a loud bang, the house shook. A support beam had broken. We ate in the family room downstairs.
December 1 at 21:47 EST .

  21 people like this.





   MeiDei  Kids clothing: Back in the 40's it was common for boys under age 13 to wear short pants (dress wear w/matching coat/jacket ) or knickers - both with knee socks. Upon turning 13 the boys wore long pants. Dress wear ensembles were sold with a short brimmed cap for boys and a bonnet for girls. The coats were made as left over right for boys & interchangeable right over left for girls. These items got passed along in families, since they were only worn for church & special occasions. Years later pea jackets were also interchangeable. The 60's brought about many changes, not all of them good.
October 28 at 16:02 EST .

   25 people like this.



   StormCnter  Mei, your memories are of what northeastern city kids wore. I grew up in rural Texas where elementary school kids could come to school barefoot. My mother never allowed it, but any class photo from those years shows both boys and girls shoeless. Younger boys wore overalls but the girls always wore dresses, usually with a sash that would come untied and stay untied all day long. Remember puffed sleeves? Back in the heavy starch/everything had to be ironed days, those sleeves were a booger to iron, but didn't they look pretty!
October 29 at 07:34 EST .

  20 people like this.



   MeiDei  Oh yes, I remember being taught to iron, first pillowcases & sheets, then curtains with ruffles, then those puffy sleeves and the challenge. Wasn't safe to go barefoot in the city - sometimes not even shod : ) The sashes that tied in the back - what boy ever resisted pulling them! I got my 1st pair of jeans (Bonnie Bell for girls ) in my Jr. year in H.S. - to go horseback riding. It was always dresses for us, even ice skating in the winter; sledding & building igloos in the snow banks brought out the snowsuits. Lots of happy memories. For school the boys all dressed in shirt (w/clip on ties ) & slacks...right through high school & I'm sure many of them would have preferred overalls or at least Levis or Wranglers. Sneakers were only worn for gym - Keds for girls & Converse hi-tops for boys - in black only : )
October 29 at 11:23 EST .

  23 people like this.



   StormCnter  I got my first pair of jeans at roughly that age, too, but they were "girls' jeans". Remember those? They zipped on the side. Boys jeans were only for boys. We rolled our jeans mid-calf and could only wear them to school on Fridays. Skirts and dresses the rest of the time.
October 29 at 14:28 EST .

  21 people like this.



   Bettijo  I am 80 years old. I was married in 1957. Although I taught school, my income went into a joint account and my husband "gave" me an allowance of $25 a week. That covered EVERYTHING I bought (no credit cards in those days ), including fabric because I made all my own clothes. I had a rule with myself that I would not spend more than an average of $1 a day for meat. If I bought a roast or something more expensive, then the other days I spent less than $1 on average. I planned menus for a week at a time and shopped once a week. It worked for a number of years, don't remember when my allowance went up, if it ever did! I was divorced in 1972; never remarried.

I retired in 2003. I have no retirement except SS and what I invested in 403b account. Today I have the same income I had in 2003. It is tough to make ends meet, but I don't want to outlive my investments (you know what I mean ). The prices in the grocery store leave me with sticker shock.
November 10 at 18:52 EST .

  20 people like this.



   Gram77  My clothes in the first grade were what my mother liked, not me. As soon as I was out of sight of the house off came the sash and the awful huge bow she always clipped in my hair. It was a bear to clip back in before getting home.
November 14 at 20:27 EST .

  23 people like this.



   StormCnter  Bettijo, I was married in 1957, too. I was 16, my brand new husband was 20. We eloped because that was the thing to do among rural teenagers in those years. I remember having to stretch 10 or 15 dollars to cover a week's groceries. Although it was hard at the time, the experience was valuable. We moved to California as soon as I had graduated (and while my irate and broken-hearted parents settled down from the elopement ). I was unable to get a job because of my age, so what to do? We had a baby, instead. We're still married and we do a lot of laughing about those years.
November 16 at 09:56 EST .

  19 people like this.



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