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Nostalgia



   Safetydude  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDc0ID6PJeg#t=155

A trip down memory lane.
August 25 at 23:11 EST .

   3 people like this.



   Gram77  Give me that good old slow dance when we were close.
August 26 at 18:30 EST .

  3 people like this.



   MeiDei  I recognized my first car - the Ford Fairlane 'tho mine was a hard top not the true convertible in this one. boy, what memories. Thanks for posting.
August 28 at 15:14 EST .

  3 people like this.





   MeiDei  Before Ringo
   August 23 at 21:45 EST .

   3 people like this.




   Safetydude  Any of you 'gear-heads' out there remember usin' 'drain oil' in you cars, back in the 50's ?

It came in glass containers with long metal spouts.
   August 21 at 18:00 EST .

   5 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  Oh, yes, recycled oil. We even used it into the late '60s, but only as an emergency topper when out on the road.
August 21 at 18:02 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Safetydude  You're right, Top.
I still used it while I was in hi-school'.
August 21 at 20:16 EST .

  4 people like this.





   Gram77  I put something on Crafts that maybe should have gone here. It's worth a look and a smile.
August 19 at 10:18 EST .

   3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Gram, I went to Crafts to see and can't find anything newer than the Fair Isle sweater pattern thread.
August 19 at 11:37 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Gram77  You must have found it later because I see your comment.
August 19 at 17:37 EST .

  4 people like this.



   StormCnter  I did and I enjoyed.
August 20 at 06:10 EST .

  3 people like this.





   MeiDei  Middle school kids of the 50's dancing
   August 17 at 13:07 EST .

   4 people like this.



   StormCnter  Perhaps at your middle school, MeiDei. At my junior high (we had no middle school in the dark ages ), we square-danced and folk-danced, even touring to other school districts to demonstrate and exhibit. Every 13 year old girl needs square dancing petticoats.
"Put your little foot..."
August 18 at 08:44 EST .

  4 people like this.



   MeiDei  Wasn't in my Jr.High either; no sock hops. Square & folk dancing were taught. Allemande left and a "dosey-doh" (sp? ) And oh those crinolines - sugar starched- wore several at a time, sewed sequins on mine : ) I remember learning the Horah folk dance to the music of Hava Nagila. Those were good times.
August 18 at 13:41 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Yeah, we tried the sugar starched petticoats, too. They worked just fine til we got hot and sweaty doing all that little-foot-putting. Then the petticoats were damp, sticky and clung to our legs. Did you ever have one that was made of nylon screening? Those were all the thing for a while. They kept their shape, they didn't get sticky and our mothers could buy the material at the hardware store.
August 18 at 16:00 EST .

  3 people like this.



   MeiDei  No to the nylon screening, we wore three at a time, starched cotton, crinoline over that & a net one over that. And if we were jitterbugging w/overhead lifts we wore those pant-slips that come to just over the knees. And the felt skirts w/the poodle : )& white bucks that we stepped on so they wouldn't look new.
August 18 at 19:06 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Yup, I had a felt skirt, though mine had a clock instead of a poodle. I also had a straw skirt that was quite attractive and I loved it until I (and the skirt ) got rained on. When wet, that skirt smelled just like a barn full of hay and animals.
August 19 at 06:23 EST .

  3 people like this.





   Linder  Who says you can't go back? While setting out the under-the-eave and porch plants into the rain I got a bit damp. Came in to change clothes and spotted the big umbrella. It's been at least 60 years since I purposely walked barefoot in running rain water in the open ditches. Now the ditches are paved gutters, wore my rubber garden shoes and back then there were no umbrellas at our house...it still felt good and familiar.
August 15 at 10:35 EST .

   4 people like this.



   StormCnter  I loved to hear about your wading in the rainwater. What fun that used to be and apparently, it still is!
August 15 at 13:59 EST .

  4 people like this.



   Surfhut  Linder, you brought back a beautiful memory. I lived in SoCal when my son was born. Traveled to OKC often so he would know and love his family here.

My parents lived next door to my sister and her family. One August afternoon, thunderstorms erupted. I held my dear toddler in my arms and raced through the downpour across the adjoining yards from my parents' to my sisters'.

My parents watched us make that run and it made them laugh out loud. It never ceases to amaze me how profound such simple things are.
August 15 at 20:27 EST .

  3 people like this.



   HopeandGlory  Reminds me of sitting on our covered front porch watching the rain pour off our metal roof, our 8 year old grandson was with us and he thought that was the neatest thing . . . Simple Pleasures, aren't they Grand!!!
August 15 at 22:05 EST .

  3 people like this.



   MeiDei  Back when I was about to undergo chemo a friend sent me a powerpoint presentation or a video(not youtube ) entitled: Dancing in the Rain - inspirational; nothing is so important that you can't take the time to relive fond memories and pass them along. Sometimes a puddle is there to be stepped in, just because.
August 16 at 00:09 EST .

  4 people like this.





   Wrightwinger  As I grew up, I heard a rich and varied dialect in my little corner of Appalachia. If you are of Scotch-Irish ancestors, see how many of these Elizabethan English terms and pronunciations you can remember, I think I heard most of them growing up... And they are fading away, into monochromatic Newspeak where accents are washed away, words lose their meaning, and their value. Enjoy!
http://www.wvculture.org/history/journal_wvh/wvh30-2.html
August 8 at 21:01 EST .

   6 people like this.



   MeiDei  Enjoyed reading that - now I know why my highly educated, world traveler friend from nearby Ohio speaks as some in the article mentioned. Found a comparison via Michener's "The Covenant" where the characters struggle to keep their languages even as they evolved into a mix vs. how the Brits insisted on English only. The root of Varsity was new to me as were the references to double negative usage. Thanks for posting!
August 9 at 12:29 EST .

  5 people like this.



   StormCnter  What an interesting article. I am well aware of my Texas twang. My Onstar cannot understand the numbers I speak into the mike (nine always is interpreted as five ) and when I tried to order a fried pie at a Utah KFC, the cashier had to call the manager who, when he finally understood, advised me that "frahd pahs" were not available, but he could offer lemon tarts.
August 12 at 08:51 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Balogreene  And in an area of Northeastern NM, linguists study their Spanish, because it is the Spanish spoken in the 16th century. Amazing what semi-isolated areas retain.
August 14 at 19:17 EST .

  5 people like this.





   StormCnter  Maybe this belongs on the Road wall, but I miss hood ornaments on cars. Now so many automobiles look like every other automobile and not many have a hood ornament. My dad had a '53 Pontiac Chieftain with the Indian head ornament. It lit up when the headlights were on, so I could always spot my dad's car when he arrived to pick me up at some after dark function.
August 8 at 15:10 EST .

   7 people like this.



   Balogreene  As I've said before, when I learned to drive, if the hood ornament was on the line on the right of the car, you were centered in your lane.
August 14 at 19:18 EST .

  4 people like this.



   MeiDei  Ditto Balo - miss them too.
August 16 at 00:18 EST .

  4 people like this.





   Ole buzzard  A friend posted on Facebook this morning that she was at Fort Gillem here in GA to watch her stepson be sworn in the military. I was reminded that when I joined the USAF in '68, we didn't have friends or family to see us off. All good-byes to the family, girlfriend, etc., had been said in the days leading up to the big day. I joined the USAF primarily because carrying an M-16 around in a rice paddy was not my idea of a good time. Apparently, a lot of guys joined the Navy for the same reason.

After we had taken our oaths of enlistment, we were segregated according to the branch we joined. About that time, a Marine DI comes out of his office, walking ramrod straight, wearing his campaign (Smokey the Bear ) hat, with a riding crop tucked under his left arm. He promptly directs all those who joined the Navy to line up against two walls of the large room we were in. He marched from the center of the room to stand in front of the first person lined up against the wall, did a left face and started marching down the line counting off with his riding crop to the shoulder of each person "One, two, three, Marine!", and on down the line. When he came to the end of the line, you could see the look of relief on the face of the last guy in line who had figured out that he was going to be a "three". But when the DI got to the end of the line, the count changed: "One, two, Marine!"

Seems those people joining the Navy did not know that the Marines are not a separate service, but part of the Navy.
August 5 at 11:39 EST .

   10 people like this.



   StormCnter  That's not funny, but it is.

My youngest brother served in the five-man River Patrol Boats in Vietnam. He came home with a Purple Heart, but he was embarrassed about it, feeling he hadn't really earned it but that the Navy felt a need for a PH in that part of country. He had a bit of shrapnel in his thigh.
August 5 at 16:23 EST .

  10 people like this.



   Safetydude  SC,

Hand salute to your youngest brother.
August 5 at 20:20 EST .

  7 people like this.



   MeiDei  I'm curious Storm was that before or after the current JFK got his 3 PH's & an out of VN?
August 5 at 20:21 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Safetydude  ???????????????????
August 5 at 21:25 EST .

  6 people like this.



   MeiDei  A swift boat reference SD - Kerry's 3 purple hearts - questionable merit - 3 PHs in three months on duty, obscure rule that he knew of 3 PHs & you get sent home from war theatre.
August 5 at 22:43 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Safetydude  My Bad!

I didn't connect the "current JFK" to John Kerry; "Who Served In Vietnam". I've never heard him referred to as Johm Forbes Kerry or JFK so it went right by me.
I had a lot of respect for the 'real' JFK.

Sorry.
August 6 at 16:40 EST .

  5 people like this.



   MeiDei  No apology needed - it took me a few days to get your "Poor Richard" reference (Weird Wall ) - Hyacinth of course! : )
August 6 at 18:11 EST .

  7 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  I join Safetydude in saluting your brother, StormCnter. River patrol was probably some of the nastiest duty over there.
August 7 at 09:39 EST .

  8 people like this.



   StormCnter  Your salutes are appreciated.
August 7 at 13:32 EST .

  6 people like this.





   StormCnter  When I was in elementary school in a small Texas town, an older lady went from school to school giving weekly private lessons in "Expression". The lessons weren't part of the school curriculum, so parents paid for them. My mother loved the idea and gladly forked over the five dollars per week. The idea was that we learned a bit of lift to our speech. When I was in sixth grade, part of my school assignment was to read aloud to the first graders so the beleaguered and overworked first grade teacher could have a break. She told me she could always tell which kids had had Expression lessons. Was this unique to Texas? Unique to our little town? Has anyone else ever had Expression lessons?
July 30 at 10:13 EST .

   11 people like this.



   MeiDei  Expression was called Inflection in our schools & was encouraged.
August 1 at 12:02 EST .

  8 people like this.



   Linder  Had never heard of Expression or Inflection lessons. Explain, please.
August 3 at 07:53 EST .

  8 people like this.



   StormCnter  Linder, the lessons were a lot of fun. I enjoyed them a lot. I would read aloud a passage from something my teacher selected, a poem, a Shakespeare soliloquy or maybe a few paragraphs from something like "A Tale of Two Cities". Then the teacher would critique, correcting which words should be given emphasis, how to breathe during a long passage without anyone realizing, how to give a lift to a word or a portion of a sentence. I learned not to pronounce "won't you" or "don't you" as "won't chu" and "don't chu", for instance. She sometimes chose a two-person skit, the two of us performing the roles. It was probably the same sort of thing theater students learned. My little town and school would have considered classes in theater to be pretentious, I think, so that good lady called it "Expression".
August 4 at 07:04 EST .

  10 people like this.



   MeiDei  Ah, if we got careless in speech our teacher would admonish us by asking if we belonged to the "dontcha, wantcha, aintcha, gonna" club. Expression & inflection are the same: give life to the spoken word vs. a monotone delivery - even facial expression was used; I think the idea was to draw the audience in & make them part of the story. It's interesting that a small town Texas gal & a large No'East city gal had similar learning without a government dictate - just good old-fashioned teaching.
August 4 at 08:35 EST .

  10 people like this.



   StormCnter  We kids drove our Louisiana-raised dad nuts by pronouncing the word "get" in the Texas way, which is "git". I'm not sure we ever completely lost the habit.
August 4 at 10:29 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  This is the practice of reading with expression, clear enunciation, and proper speed and loudness. If one has ever been stuck listening for a lengthy time to a poor reader, and then was exposed to a good oral reader... It makes all the difference!
August 4 at 18:21 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Linder  Liked this discussion! Thanks.
August 5 at 20:02 EST .

  10 people like this.



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