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Nostalgia



   MeiDei  Kids clothing: Back in the 40's it was common for boys under age 13 to wear short pants (dress wear w/matching coat/jacket ) or knickers - both with knee socks. Upon turning 13 the boys wore long pants. Dress wear ensembles were sold with a short brimmed cap for boys and a bonnet for girls. The coats were made as left over right for boys & interchangeable right over left for girls. These items got passed along in families, since they were only worn for church & special occasions. Years later pea jackets were also interchangeable. The 60's brought about many changes, not all of them good.
October 28 at 16:02 EST .

   10 people like this.



   StormCnter  Mei, your memories are of what northeastern city kids wore. I grew up in rural Texas where elementary school kids could come to school barefoot. My mother never allowed it, but any class photo from those years shows both boys and girls shoeless. Younger boys wore overalls but the girls always wore dresses, usually with a sash that would come untied and stay untied all day long. Remember puffed sleeves? Back in the heavy starch/everything had to be ironed days, those sleeves were a booger to iron, but didn't they look pretty!
October 29 at 07:34 EST .

  8 people like this.



   MeiDei  Oh yes, I remember being taught to iron, first pillowcases & sheets, then curtains with ruffles, then those puffy sleeves and the challenge. Wasn't safe to go barefoot in the city - sometimes not even shod : ) The sashes that tied in the back - what boy ever resisted pulling them! I got my 1st pair of jeans (Bonnie Bell for girls ) in my Jr. year in H.S. - to go horseback riding. It was always dresses for us, even ice skating in the winter; sledding & building igloos in the snow banks brought out the snowsuits. Lots of happy memories. For school the boys all dressed in shirt (w/clip on ties ) & slacks...right through high school & I'm sure many of them would have preferred overalls or at least Levis or Wranglers. Sneakers were only worn for gym - Keds for girls & Converse hi-tops for boys - in black only : )
October 29 at 11:23 EST .

  8 people like this.



   StormCnter  I got my first pair of jeans at roughly that age, too, but they were "girls' jeans". Remember those? They zipped on the side. Boys jeans were only for boys. We rolled our jeans mid-calf and could only wear them to school on Fridays. Skirts and dresses the rest of the time.
October 29 at 14:28 EST .

  6 people like this.



   Bettijo  I am 80 years old. I was married in 1957. Although I taught school, my income went into a joint account and my husband "gave" me an allowance of $25 a week. That covered EVERYTHING I bought (no credit cards in those days ), including fabric because I made all my own clothes. I had a rule with myself that I would not spend more than an average of $1 a day for meat. If I bought a roast or something more expensive, then the other days I spent less than $1 on average. I planned menus for a week at a time and shopped once a week. It worked for a number of years, don't remember when my allowance went up, if it ever did! I was divorced in 1972; never remarried.

I retired in 2003. I have no retirement except SS and what I invested in 403b account. Today I have the same income I had in 2003. It is tough to make ends meet, but I don't want to outlive my investments (you know what I mean ). The prices in the grocery store leave me with sticker shock.
November 10 at 18:52 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Gram77  My clothes in the first grade were what my mother liked, not me. As soon as I was out of sight of the house off came the sash and the awful huge bow she always clipped in my hair. It was a bear to clip back in before getting home.
November 14 at 20:27 EST .

  3 people like this.



   StormCnter  Bettijo, I was married in 1957, too. I was 16, my brand new husband was 20. We eloped because that was the thing to do among rural teenagers in those years. I remember having to stretch 10 or 15 dollars to cover a week's groceries. Although it was hard at the time, the experience was valuable. We moved to California as soon as I had graduated (and while my irate and broken-hearted parents settled down from the elopement ). I was unable to get a job because of my age, so what to do? We had a baby, instead. We're still married and we do a lot of laughing about those years.
November 16 at 09:56 EST .




   Linder  Remember when a McDonald's hamburger cost $.25 and fries were a dime. Well, I had Gramps go thro the drive-thro today for a med. bag of fries and the cost was $1.92. I'm still in shock. What in the world will a bag of fries cost when the Democrats get the minimum wage raised to $17.00?
October 19 at 20:05 EST .

   13 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  The decimal point has shifted one place to the right... And maybe doubled as well. Everything except retirement income and bank interest. Go to Wendy's, or McDonald's and a couple of burgers, fries, and two large drinks will probably set you back 15 bucks. Remember " Change back from your dollar?" And Clara Peller saying "Where's the beef?" And let's don't talk about the Grocery Store!!!
October 20 at 20:22 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Safetydude  Well, the problem is that you don't realize how good our economy is under BHO. You aren't paying attention to his speeches. And by the way, inflation is at zero percent, never mind the cost of bread, milk, heat, gasoline, electricity, etc.

I don't think anyone under the age of 60 or 70 have any idea of how much the cost of living has risen in the last twenty years.
October 20 at 22:42 EST .

  9 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  Dude, I remember only 18 years ago buying cigarettes for less than $1.00 per pack. I don't smoke anymore, but what are they now? I remember buying "top shelf" beer for $2.00 for a six pack. Now I'm paying $8.99!!!!
October 21 at 01:55 EST .

  9 people like this.



   MeiDei  Wouldn't you like to see the "real" price of any item before a Federal and/or State tax is added to it. I bet it would be shocking. I remember in Econ 101 we followed the cost of a loaf of bread: wheat from the farm to the packaged product in the store -- surprising.
October 21 at 18:39 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Linder  I am 70 and sorry to say, started smoking when I was 12...my friend Mary and I swiped Chesterfields from her mother and Camels from my dad.. Could buy my Pal Mal cigarettes from the corner gas station when I was 13-14 for $.25. What a pain it was when they raised a penny at a time, to come up with those pennies. Stopped smoking when I was 50 (by hypnosis ) and was paying $2.00+ a pack. I can't imagine paying $5.00+ for a pack of cigarettes today. We aren't rich and we aren't poor ... but there is a limit when we stop buying. Maybe $1.92 for a bag of fries is it.
October 21 at 22:42 EST .

  11 people like this.



   StormCnter  Back in the days when high school girls were required to take at least one semester of Home Economics, we were taught to plan menus for a week in advance and how to shop for the required groceries. I was married at 16, but I had learned well and could buy groceries for a week of meals for 12-15 dollars. Tuna was 25 cents a can, a pack of weiners was 50 cents, a loaf of bread was 30 cents, a whole bag of potatoes was under a dollar. But, everyone was making less money then. I guess it's all relative.
October 22 at 07:25 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Surfhut  I'm 60. One of my favorite memories from childhood was my big brother and I going to the movies every Saturday. Tickets were 25 cents each.
October 24 at 07:30 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Balogreene  I'm 62 and I remember my Uncle Bill saying he'd quit smoking when a pack cost $.50 in machines. He did too. But that was 100 years ago.
October 27 at 17:21 EST .

  9 people like this.





   StormCnter  I deleted this and made a new comment because it didn't really belong on Mei's autograph book thread. But, I was addressing Balo's comment about fake autographs.

Balo, many years ago, I was party to a joke with a trick like that. My rancher cousin came by the office to see me while he was in town. He had taken his kids to show their sheep at the Fort Worth Stock Show, so he was in complete western finery, from boots to hat. I took him through the entire building, just to show him the machines and what was going on. Every machinist stopped to watch. We did not know the shop foreman was telling the guys my cousin was Merle Haggard. By the time we got back to the door to the office, one of the less popular guys was pulling on my cousin's arm and asking for "an album". Of course my cousin had no idea what the guy was talking about, so simply smiled and went through the door. The guy who had asked for the album was so excited that later in the day I told him I would get him an album. On the way home, I stopped at K-Mart and bought a Merle Haggard album, took it home, and wrote "To Rich, Best Wishes, Your friend Merle Haggard" in a big swoopy autograph-looking hand on the front. The next day, I presented it to him. A few days later he got fired. I've wondered for years if he still treasures his fake Merle Haggard meeting and the souvenir album.
October 14 at 17:55 EST .

   15 people like this.



   Balogreene  I hope he treasures it forever. My "little" sisters did, until I fessed up, then they hated me for ages.
October 14 at 21:19 EST .

  12 people like this.



   Balogreene  Oh Storm, I have to say. My baby sister goes to auctions and estate sales all the time. She has gotten me some really great autographed stuff. She can't hate me too much.
October 14 at 21:21 EST .

  13 people like this.





   MeiDei  Remember when we had autograph books a way back when. We'd have everyone writing something in them. I remember four especially, one of which I mentioned on the movie wall. "A ring is round and has no end and so my love for you dear friend" - another: "If you have a friend keep him so, for if your friend becomes your foe then all the world your secrets will know". Followed by: "I love you, I love you, I love you so well - if I had a peanut I'd give you the shell" & lastly: "Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, what's a sweater without a bust". Are there any you remember?
October 12 at 12:33 EST .

   13 people like this.



   Balogreene  I started First Grade in 1958, and graduated from High School in 1970. We never had autograph books. I love hearing about them. But, we did go places, and sign fake autographs from famous people, and give them to younger brothers and sisters. My sisters have never forgiven me.
October 13 at 19:04 EST .

  16 people like this.



   MeiDei  The "Roses are Red, Violets are Blue" ones were cute-nasty.
The one I now remember is: Rose are red, violets are blue, if I looked like you, I'd belong in the zoo"
October 13 at 21:04 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  I've posted this once before, but here's my favorite "roses" rhyme:
Rose are red,
Violets are blue,
I'm schizophrenic,
And so am I.
October 14 at 22:15 EST .

  13 people like this.



   HopeandGlory  Remember me on the River
Remember me on the Lake
Remember me on your Wedding Day
and send me a piece of Cake.
October 15 at 18:18 EST .

  11 people like this.



   HopeandGlory  2 Y's u r
2 Y's u b
i c u r
2 Y's 4 me.
October 15 at 18:19 EST .

  11 people like this.



   StormCnter  Remember Roger Miller?
They say roses are red and violets are purple
And sugar's sweet and so is maple syrple
October 16 at 06:47 EST .

  10 people like this.



   MeiDei  To those who contributed to this thread here's one for you:
U R 2 good 2 B 4 got 10.
October 21 at 18:30 EST .

  16 people like this.





   Balogreene  I love this picture. My younger sister's identical twin youngest children. When I posted it online, they responded, they hadn't realize they looked that much alike! The rest of us have for 23 years.

We were at a restaurant, they each wanted the seat by the wall, so they played rock, paper, scissors, 10 times. It wasn't best of, it was winner gets the wall. No one won. They tied all ten times before they gave up. But, twins aren't psychic, we all know that.

   September 30 at 23:24 EST .

   12 people like this.




   Balogreene  This is the house I grew up in, so full of love and memories. We went to Rockford, IL for a memorial service, and my sister and I made our way from the church here, by memory (we hadn't been back since about 1980 ). The huge oak that held the tire swing, the flowering crab in front, the lilacs on the side, and the basement door are all gone. But, it has really been kept up, and really is still a beautiful home, don't you think?
   September 27 at 09:57 EST .

   17 people like this.



   Gram77  This is a beautiful house and it oozes love.
September 28 at 10:12 EST .

  20 people like this.



   Balogreene  Of course, when we lived in it, 1958 -1970, it was white, with black shutters, typical hundred year old farm house. But, the story of our living there is so great. Mom was taking Aunt Ruth (the lady whose memorial we were at ) to work. They drove past the house, and it had a for sale sign. Mom said she wanted that house. Aunt Ruth said the people who owned it went to her church, so she talked to them (they built a modern house on the corner lot next door ). They arranged for mom and Aunt Ruth to go through the house, mom fell more in love with it. So, in mom's words "Daddy bought it for me". He never really liked it, but modernized the wiring and plumbing, etc. When we went by, she said she still loves it.
September 28 at 21:49 EST .

  19 people like this.



   StormCnter  My Louisiana grandparents' rambling old two-story house, built in 1905 after their honeymoon at the St. Louis fair (yes, the Judy Garland one ), was purchased from my aunt and then moved to a new location in town. The young couple who bought it kept it mostly the same, but updated the location of the upstairs windows and added a more efficient kitchen at the back. A couple of years ago, four cousins and I spent a lovely Saturday morning peering into the windows of the uncompleted renovation and calling to each other about what used to be here and what used to be there. I'm sad it was moved, but I'm thrilled it is occupied by a young family who loves it.
September 29 at 09:25 EST .

  20 people like this.



   Balogreene  Storm, people have asked if we went up to the door and told them we grew up there, and asked for a tour. If I lived there today, I might want to modernize the house. But, I don't want to know they did it. I want to remember the happy things that happened there.
September 29 at 18:36 EST .

  19 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Wow, I love that house.
October 3 at 19:18 EST .

  8 people like this.





   Gram77  I'm sort of all over the place today. Out of nowhere hubby, while watching a cooking show said the cook's apron looks like a feed sack. When I was really little my great grandmother made me play clothes from feed sacks. Their prints were really pretty and the material wore like iron.
September 25 at 13:51 EST .

   16 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  During the mid 1950s, my Dad sold Larro (General Mills ) feeds in his feed and grain store. A lot of the Larro products were sold in printed cotton bags.
September 30 at 16:19 EST .

  15 people like this.



   BirdsNest  I don't remember them, but Hagar does. When we were in Parachute,CO, Hagar worked on the Union Oil shale project and we shopped in Rifle. They sold 50# sacks of flour and sugar in print sacks at City Market. They also would send you home with dry ice for your cold items if you lived far away-lots of people lived as many as 50 miles away and shopped there.
October 3 at 19:23 EST .

  12 people like this.





   StormCnter  Anybody here experienced telephone party lines in his or her youth? At the farm, we were on an 8-party line. Everyone had a signature ring, so when all 8 phones rang, we could tell who the call wes for. Our ring was two longs and a short. My mother never allowed us to "listen in" to phone calls that weren't ours, but one neighbor was a veteran listener. And, if she had something to add to the conversation, she would jump right in. My buddy, Gary, lived in town so he had a private line. He and I would hang on the phone for as long as we could get away with it until someone would break in, "Honey, I hate to interrupt, but I need the phone". So, we would hang up so others could make calls.

Anyone else?
September 18 at 17:09 EST .

   21 people like this.



   Gerty  Evidently, Miss Storm, you are NOT as old as dirt (as am I! ). We did not grow up on a farm but we had a party line nonetheless. At the time, it is my recollection that there was a choice---party line was cheaper while a private line was prohibitively expensive. This is how it was in a suburb of NYC.
I don't remember listening in on any conversations but they were forever taking place! Guess I was more interested in going out to play.
September 20 at 06:47 EST .

  19 people like this.



   Linder  As a teenager, 60+ years ago, Gramps worked as a janitor at the local telephone office. The operators, who handled every single call, became his life long friends. While he was in the Army and if his parents didn't answer one of his long distance calls, one of his operator friends would come on the line and ask if he wanted her to find them...or would tell him where his parents were that evening. Who says we didn't have good technology back then...those ladies knew everything!
September 21 at 10:33 EST .

  22 people like this.



   Gerty  And they had "Number, Please" down to an art!
September 22 at 19:49 EST .

  20 people like this.



   StormCnter  Even as late as the mid-fifties, small towns in Texas had phone offices with one operator on duty at all times. Long distance calls couldn't be placed from our homes, but had to be placed, in person, at the phone office. For an international call, we sat and waited for the call to go through. Sometimes it took a long time.

Remember that old song, "Hello Central, Give Me Heaven"?
September 23 at 06:53 EST .

  15 people like this.



   Gram77  All through my high school years we had a party line and a special ring. The one I remember the most (because I was gabbing with a girl friend ) "hang up I need the fire department, my barn is on fire". Way, way back before my mother was even married, the phones were on the wall and there was something called Central. The switchboards were in the house of whoever ran this switchboard. Mom said you would crank a small handle on the side of the phone to get Central and then ask the operator to ring Joe Jones or Bob Brown. My mother and her mother did that for several years for a small pittance of pay. Now that memory is old as dirt!
September 23 at 10:26 EST .

  21 people like this.



   StormCnter  Forgive one more memory of small towns and fire departments. One teenage summer, I accidentally set the oven on fire. My mother told me to call the volunteer fire department because we were having trouble putting it out. When I picked up the phone, it was in use. A neighbor was chatting with my home ec teacher in town. I excitedly told them I had to call the fire department and my home ec teacher (Mrs. Morrow ) said, "Oh Linda get out of that house, I'll call the fire department for you". So, a good half hour later, my mother and I had extinguished the fire. While we caught our breath, Mother said call the fire department and tell them we no longer need them. I picked up the phone to find my neighbor and Mrs. Morrow still chatting. I said, "Oh, Mrs. Morrow, will you tell the fire department it's ok now?" She sighed and said, "Linda, I never was able to find my glasses to look up the number and then I forgot all about it."

Well !!!
September 23 at 10:51 EST .

  18 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  In 1960, when we moved from Libertyville, Illinois, to Antioch, Illinois, it was like moving into the past. In Libertyville, Illinois Bell used seven digit dialing, whereas in Antioch, all calls in or out had to be operator assisted, unless we were dialing another Antioch number. Then we would dial the three or four digit number.
September 30 at 16:23 EST .

  12 people like this.





   Safetydude  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDc0ID6PJeg#t=155

A trip down memory lane.
August 25 at 23:11 EST .

   17 people like this.



   Gram77  Give me that good old slow dance when we were close.
August 26 at 18:30 EST .

  14 people like this.



   MeiDei  I recognized my first car - the Ford Fairlane 'tho mine was a hard top not the true convertible in this one. boy, what memories. Thanks for posting.
August 28 at 15:14 EST .

  18 people like this.





   MeiDei  Before Ringo
   August 23 at 21:45 EST .

   15 people like this.



   Balogreene  For those too young to remember, they are Pete Best, George, John, Paul, and Stu Sutcliffe, who died before the big time.
September 7 at 20:43 EST .

  11 people like this.



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