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Health & Diet



   BirdsNest  Worst.Leg.Cramps.EVER.
I had just gotten into bed when they hit, both legs from feet to hips. Try getting up from that. I had taken some cramp pills but they did not even begin to alleviate the pain. After 10 minutes of pain I relented and took something stronger. It took an additional 10 minutes for that to work. Felt like my legs were going to break, the muscles were angry. I guess it was from so much standing yesterday. Nothing physical, just working on relish and canning it. And it was chilly, we have not turned on any heat as yet.
October 20 at 07:37 EST .

   2 people like this.



   MeiDei  Suffer from leg cramps from time to time - especially those that wake you up in the middle of your sleep. My doctor suggested I drink quinine water (tonic w/quinine ) the amount of which is too slight to affect other medications you may be taking. What did you take that helped? I find getting up and walking on it helps - but sometimes the foot is so contorted I can't put on my slippers. BTW the same can happen from too much sitting.
October 20 at 13:57 EST .

 1 person like this.



   BirdsNest  Drinking too much tonic water really affects my blood sugar, so I don't take as much as Hagar does. I took a muscle relaxer and it did not work as fast as i wanted it to so I grabbed 1/2 of a pain pill. Still it took 15 minutes to start easing the cramps. My big toe was sticking straight up and I was in awful pain. I left the bedroom and went into the office where the parrots are. Two of them started making soothing noises while I was whining in pain, I knew what they were trying to do and I thought it was sweet. Once the pain quit I hobbled in the other room and took my blood sugar, it was 438 from stress, it certainly wasn't from eating anything after dinner. And I had just taken my night time shot so all that elevation was from the stress of the pain.
October 20 at 18:03 EST .

 1 person like this.



   MeiDei  I found this article interesting & thought of you Bird (& me )it relates to mineral deficiency. It sparked my memory banks about making sure to get enough magnesium/potassium.
http://truththeory.com/2013/04/02/16-sig
ns-youre-magnesium-deficient-symptoms-of
-low-magnesium-levels/
I'm going to adjust my meals/supplements to see what happens.
Tuesday at 12:30 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  I take diuretics, and I don't have any real solutions when the electrolytes get out of whack. Diet is one source of magnesium/potassium/sodium, of course, but sometimes one needs supplements. A doctor and a blood test can see what you are deficient from in your diet. They are excruciating, aren't they? I usually have to walk them off. It is a poor night sleep that occurs when the cramps are happening. Someone I met in a Dr. Waiting room suggested warm water soaking the foot might help.
Yesterday at 21:47 EST .

 1 person like this.



   BirdsNest  I take daily calcium/magnesium/potassium and D all at the same time. Get plenty of vit B complex, K2, and also take cinnamon and turmeric for blood sugar.Lutein for eyes and a small dose of Lisinopril to protect the kidneys.
Yesterday at 22:08 EST .

 1 person like this.



   MeiDei  Sounds as if you're doing everything right. I get regular blood work done from primary care & oncology & the tests almost always show up within normal parameters. I think it's time to praise God anyway and let Him handle the occurrences and severity - or just stop them cold : ) The last one I had the big toe tried to romance my knee but the hollow in my calf (size & shape of an English cucumber ) was an impediment. : ) I'm just grateful to live to talk about it .. and yes, walk it off making faces - that always helps ....
20 hours ago .


   Clipped wings  My husband also suffers from leg cramps from time to time. He found if he drinks V-8 juice they diminish in frequency. A woman I knew had the problem and she relied on pickle juice. Old time remedies but each providing a needed nutrient.
19 hours ago .




   Attercliffe  Please forgive haste, never enough time in the day. . . .

Just got back from picking up prescriptions at Walgreen's and noticed they had N95 masks and nitrile gloves on sale. The pharm asst said their branch had them on sale but didn't know about others. She raised her eyebrows and said, "Ebola?" I said, "Yeah--you?" "Got mine on Wednesday," she smiled.

Good advice on supplies, especially toilet paper. A Bosnian survivor said the most wanted item during the war was that product. Walmart sels large cases of them online. Oh, before I forget. Do NOT let ANYbody know you are stashing supplies. Many of you are used to be saying this over at the main forum: when rationing began in WWII, anyone found with a stash--"hoarding"--found their goods confiscated and they were fined. Those who weren't prudent enough to stash were jealous of those who did. And that included relatives. Time like that, you can't trust anyone.

Stash food: Mountain House is the best, according to all kinds of polls and reviews. Have about a 30- or 35-year shelf life if kept at room temp. Used to use BePrepared.com, best prices, super selection. But they got a marketing department recently . . . . Now that they're sending out tempting ads with luscious descriptions on the food, prices have increased. So I wait until KarstSports.com has a real sale on #10 cans, when the prices go below those of BP. Karst still has free shipping on orders over $30 so that saves up to $12.95 over ordering from BP. Karst also sells the Mountain House 2-people, 3-days bucket of foil package foods, see http://www.karstsports.com/moho72hoemki.html#.VDr0qbNAx_Q

Handy to have around, but of course not as economical as #10 cans. If you or a friend has access to Sam's or Costco, then pick up those six packs of chicken or tuna or whatever. You can order similar items online at Walmart too. I just ordered light tuna and Valley Fresh organic chicken. Walmart will ship groceries for free, I think the line is $40 or something like that.

Stash batteries and chargers! You can get solar chargers these days. Less risk of fire, specially if you have cats or small children.

Ack, gotta go. Will come back later.
October 12 at 17:46 EST .

   3 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  I would suggest canning chicken yourself. Much cheaper than the little cans...
October 13 at 17:56 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Balogreene  I also can (not pressure yet ), and watch what we use. We live 3 in a small townhouse, but do keep some stocks. It's good to have things around.
Know what you use in a year. Buy those things on sale, yes, you will have a stock, but you will also save money. Can (jar ) if you can, keep what you can around. For us, September/October is bad. Personal Property tax, Insurance, and normal car maintenance all due in two-weeks. Those two-weeks we break into the pantry and the freezer. Then, we restock. We may not ear well, but we have lots of food stored up. I'm trying to keep it more balanced.
October 13 at 18:15 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Attercliffe  Canning is an excellent idea, Wrightwinger; unfortunately, I can't stand for long periods of time and am a little unbalanced (mentally and physically, lol ). Working around a vat of boiling water is not a good idea for me. But I did think about using my dehydrater and vacuum packing the results. Has anyone had good results with that method? How long would the dried version last? I'm looking at a one- to two-year plan for items that may be hard to come by.

Balogreene, I've noticed that emergency food, like Mountain House, is often high in calories (starch ). It's one reason I stopped by Home Depot yesterday and picked up lettuce and kale plants. The kale I bought last season still has a few surviving plants in the Earth Box. (If you use planters, be sure and hide them from neighbors--Mine are on wheeled stands and I can wheel them into the garage at night.

While I didn't actually recycle tin foil milk bottle covers until after the war, I did do it. All of our metal had gone into tanks and planes and that sort of thing. And our factories had gone to smithereens, thanks to the bombings. Most of what I know about surviving WWII came from my parents; to me it was normal life, I didn't know anything else. Out of food? We put cubes of bread in a bowl and poured hot tea over. Ack? We called it "pobs." No milk? We had to drink our tea without it and it was called "soldier's tea." You didn't complain, knowing the troops were even more deprived than we were.

But that was another life--today is a bit different. I've just placed an order at Walmart's online site. Free shipping, by the way, except for the Tyvek suits which come from one of their associate companies (Wayfair ). The suits (with boots and hood ) were around $10 each. Don't need too many of those! If we don't use them, they'll be great when touching up paint around the house. I also ordered some old-fashioned Lysol disinfectant concentrate. (Bleach strength begins to deteriorate after six months whether or not the jug has been opened. ) It was around $3.50/bottle for enough to make 9 gallons of solution. A couple of pairs of safety glasses rounded things out--around $8. Masks and gloves are already stored.

After reading Ldot articles today, I reasoned that the news tonight will be full of the details and people will be reaching for their keyboards after dinner. Decided I should get stuff ordered now in case we start seeing a run on supplies. After seeing how fast shelves are cleared when a hurricane is due around here, I can just imagine what it would be like if a hurricane threatened the whole country. It's not as if the stuff I've ordered won't get used at some point and it won't break the bank. Yet.

Oh--home delivery. It's scheduled for about 7 days hence but the
October 14 at 16:05 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Attercliffe  Cont'd. . .

but the WM orders often arrive earlier than their initial ETA. You can do ship-to-store but I think many of us might be at the point where we don't really want to go to a crowded store. I've already decided that if we need items we'll be going to the 24-hour WM shortly after dawn. . . .

Which reminds me, I forgot to order shelf-stable milk. I have powdered but would like to use "real" milk as long as possible. That's okay, I'm sure there are a few more things I forgot.

Will check back later and hope someone can educate me about dehydrating chicken.
October 14 at 16:07 EST .

  3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  There is a lot of information on this site. Seems Chef Glen prefers to dehydrate previously canned chicken. Further down in the article a poster shares his tips for dehydrating chicken that you cook yourself. Hope this helps you.


http://www.backpackingchef.com/dehydrati
ng-chicken.html
October 15 at 14:52 EST .

 1 person like this.



   Attercliffe  Thank you, BirdsNest, this is exactly what I need to know. Not much point in dehydrating canned chicken (I bought some canned, diced, freeze-dried chicken from BePrepared.com when they had it on sale earlier this year ). I think I'll check out the turkey breasts available this weekend. I'm thinking a couple of turkey breasts might work fairly well. It seems pre-steaming is the key to a good end result and I would never have thought of that.

I hope the Ebola crisis fizzles out quickly, of course (who doesn't? ), but if it goes on for a while I'll be glad I dried some food, chewy or not.

Thanks again, BN.
October 16 at 00:16 EST .

  2 people like this.





   Alice  After reading about the Ebola case in Dallas for a few days, I'm trying to decide how best to react. The clock is ticking on finding out how many more people with Ebola have entered the country and how far the known infection has spread. If there is nothing more by say October 25, we'll know the Dallas case is completely contained (3 weeks max for symptoms after infection ).
One the one hand, the federal government represented in the persons at CDC and Homeland Security decided early this year not to restrict people travelling into the US who had been in countries with the epidemic. They consciously decided to take the risk and see how it turned out, or just went with the fog of complacency about Ebola that seems characteristic of the left. On the other hand, after several months there is only one patient zero in the US, the man in Dallas, so in a way they have been proven right. (Ranting about them deciding to experiment with our lives is being done offline here. )

I don't have a clue how many it would take to overload what is optimistically called the system, that is, the hospitals that are prepared for quarantines and treating Ebola, but I doubt it is as long as 3 months if an epidemic got started.

It's hard to decide how much to prepare. We have a bug-out bag in progress, but we've been pretty casual about it instead of actually getting it fully packed. We're preparing to bug out because we live near a nuclear power plant though, not because of sudden fear over Ebola. And it seems more likely that if there were an epidemic, we'd have to hunker down rather than go anywhere.

If there were an epidemic or even just a few cases in our area, then up to a point we'd still have to get groceries, buy gas, etc., and hope to protect ourselves in the process. I have looked at N95 masks on Amazon a few times and also thought about buying several cheap shower curtains and extra bleach and gloves, but I do not have a feel for what is reasonable to do versus what is silly. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
October 4 at 11:33 EST .

   4 people like this.

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   MeiDei  Having lived through a dock strike in HI in the early 70's & knowing people in the mts. that store up for the winter when roads are inaccessible, and now living in the NoEast with hurricanes and winter power outages - I'd say stock up on anything that has a long shelf life, staples, meds & anything that is usable after any problem has passed. I have a ready supply of surgical gloves that are used inside my gardening gloves as well as for making meatballs or handling any food that stains the hands. When the trucks don't roll the first thing that disappears from the shelves are paper products (t.p., towels, tissues ) and sugar, then salt, flour & rice. I keep a hibachi & charcoal in a dry place, plus candles of all sorts for power outages. You've reminded me that I haven't any way of treating water or a battery operated radio : )
I think you've given us all food for thought & I also welcome what others think or are doing. Since all banks now operate electronically as do gas pumps - preparing for that loss of service is smart regardless of whatever the problems may be (we're supposed to have record breaking cold temps. this season - so being prepared is not a bad thing ).
October 6 at 11:59 EST .

  4 people like this.



   Bettijo  Here is a very moving first-person story of a woman doctor who survived Ebola. It kind of gives you an idea of what to expect.

http://dailypost.ng/2014/09/15/ebola-sec
ond-doctor-infected-patrick-sawyer-survi
ves-tells-full-story/
October 6 at 17:43 EST .

  5 people like this.



   Bettijo  I forgot--I wanted to ask--who is paying medical bills for our Ebola patients? That man in Texas is not even an American citizen.
October 6 at 17:48 EST .

  3 people like this.



   MeiDei  Wow, that is some testimony just as important for any illness too big to seemingly handle at the time. Thanks for posting.
October 6 at 20:00 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Bettijo  Alice: I really know nothing about "prepping," but came across this site which might give you some ideas.
http://www.naturalnews.com/047160_preppe
r_websites_economic_collapse_pandemic.ht
ml
October 7 at 09:51 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Alice  MeiDei, thank you so much for sharing your experiences with shortages. Our immediate purchases will include the hibachi and charcoal as well as radio batteries. I have re-read your reply a couple of times and need to prioritize a list. It's all a little more urgent after seeing the LA Times piece ''Some Ebola experts worry virus may spread more easily than assumed.''

Bettijo, thank you for the link to the links. It will take a while to absorb and decide what to do.

I don't know how Presbyterian will cover the cost of treating Mr. Duncan. I suppose it will cover much of the cost the way they all do, through inflated payments by the private sector and some payments through taxpayers' programs.
October 7 at 13:23 EST .

  4 people like this.



   MeiDei  Alice, I like the hibachi for its portability - if we have to leave the house it takes up little space in the car & getting rid of the spent coals is easier too; I'm glad you may go that route - a plus is they're cheap.
October 7 at 18:51 EST .

  3 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  I would suggest that household bleach (liquid Chlorox type ) is an excellent killer of bacteria and viruses. It can be used to purify water, sanitize most anything, and of course for whitening laundry or stained dishes. Potable water is vital for drinking, cooking, and washing in a disaster. Just a thought...
October 8 at 19:15 EST .

  5 people like this.



   BirdsNest  I would like to add to WW's post, UNSCENTED chlorine bleach. Very important.
October 9 at 07:05 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Bettijo  This from a friend in Florida:

"The best source of info came to me from Attercliffe, she survived the Blitz, even taking the tin tops from the milk bottles to the munitions plants in the UK.



I have used www.BePrepared.com for about 3 years, they have blogs and info that will tell you every thing you need to know.

Sign up for their catalog - Emergency Essentials

After going through 4 hurricanes in 44 days, unprepared, believe me, I now have everything.

2 charcoal grills , a solar oven, water barrels, tools, generator, hand crank radio’s w/ cell phone chargers, cases of liquid candles, paper products, Puritan Pride vitamins, Dog meds and 25 yr dehydrated food. Soil here is terrible so 2 Earth Boxes that Flaming Sword told me about and a barrel that produces 100LBs of potato.

I have a brown thumb, wish I lived next to Birdy, LOL On a limited budget, it took me this long to get every thing when they have a sale, but the food is tasty.

Also use the FoodSaver Vac packer to store rice, sugar, salt, flour, pasta, before I knew about EE, have to be careful in Florida, we are known for bugs, and after 40 yrs of snow, and good freezes, had to learn storage down here."
October 9 at 09:13 EST .

  5 people like this.


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   BirdsNest  Last night I was cutting watermelon rind to make pickle when the really sharp knife slipped and sliced a part of my index finger. I grabbed it and ran into the kitchen (we were watching a movie at the time ), saw that it probably needed a butterfly, so I had to show it to Hagar. Searched for the butterfly bandages I KNOW we bought. Nada. So i brought him paper tape which he made into 2 butterflys. A bandaid around them and a glove on the hand and I was back in business. Got 9# of rind from 3 good sized watermelon. Now on to the next of 4 more days til it's ready to jar and process. Sure hope it is good.
October 1 at 18:23 EST .

   3 people like this.



   MeiDei  If your recipe for this is a good one I would like to have it.
October 6 at 16:32 EST .

  3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  With or without the cut finger?
Truthfully, I do not even remember tasting the stuff. I know my grandmother made it but my mother never canned anything, she didn't have to, her mother did it all for us. Anytime we visited, she could take whatever she wanted from the root cellar or the freezer at Grandmother's house. I never remembered it coming to us. Hagar knows he has tasted it but that was when he was a small child. So I have several customers from the flea market who will do a taste test for us on Saturday if it does not rain. We got 11 half pints and 7 pints(plus 1 broken in the canner and 1 with no juice that I spilled all over the floor and 1 that survived my handling for tasting ). It's pretty but oh so sweet. We had 9 pounds of rind to work with.
October 7 at 07:34 EST .

  3 people like this.



   MeiDei  I can cut my own finger Bird, but thanks for the offer : )
October 7 at 18:53 EST .

  3 people like this.



   BirdsNest  MeiDei you caused me to laugh a good belly laugh!!
Once I get someone to taste the final result I can share the recipe.
Today we made basil jelly, it is good too! We don't really eat much of the stuff we can but we do taste it to make sure it is edible for others. Thinking about sage jelly-bet that would be good with pork roast.
October 7 at 19:55 EST .

  4 people like this.



   MeiDei  My goal is to make someone smile, or chuckle every day - a belly laugh is a wonderful bonus. I'm praying for fair weather this weekend for you & that Hagar is feeling better.
October 7 at 21:27 EST .

  3 people like this.





   Hollyhock  Hi Clipped Wings and Mei Day. Could you give more information about the Doctor/clinic that does stem cell treatments in Tennessee? BIL is very interested and is in TN.
September 17 at 20:08 EST .

   10 people like this.



   Clipped wings  I am refraining from endorsing this treatment...yet. I have had two injections and didn't get much, if any, improvement from the second. I have one more and I hope there will be marked improvement.
This is a doctor from Viet Nam. He only charges a small sum for his time/equipment. He has remarkable stories of some of the research he was involved with. From those, I have hope!
September 23 at 18:39 EST .

  10 people like this.



   MeiDei  Sorry Hollyhock I am as much interested as you are with no experience or anything to offer. Since passing along the information (below ) a friend told me her husband had checked with his doctor and was told he was, unfortunately, not a good candidate for it.
For your sake Clipped I'm offering prayers for a well received cure.
September 24 at 21:12 EST .

  3 people like this.



   MeiDei  Hollyhock - this was posted on The Forum and by morning could swiftly go to another page or 2 or 3 before you might get to see it. It has to do with stem cell breakthrough for arthritis suffers.
http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/heal
th/519927/Arthritis-breakthrough-end-pai
n-for-sufferers
October 8 at 00:51 EST .

  4 people like this.





   BirdsNest  I found this to be interesting.
http://www.naturalnews.com/046783_neem_skin_health_Ayurvedic
_medicine.html
September 8 at 08:45 EST .

   12 people like this.



   Dixonnh  Has anyone used neem products?
September 18 at 17:07 EST .

  10 people like this.



   BirdsNest  We use Neem oil for the garden, spray it on the soil and on plants for insects. Never have used it for skin care but it has a nice smell.
September 19 at 07:19 EST .

  11 people like this.





   Clipped wings  Does anyone here have experience (personal or heresay ) about stem cell treatments? I have a few friends that have had success with this method of treatment on knees which would otherwise need replacement.
September 4 at 11:22 EST .

   7 people like this.



   MeiDei  I wish I did, I'm hoping before I die science will have something to help those paralyzed, both para & quads. I want to see my son walk again. Would like to hear more about your friends success avoiding knee surgery & where they got treatment.
September 5 at 21:40 EST .

  9 people like this.



   Clipped wings  Apparently this can be done in our country for most any problem except the back and neck. Other countries are doing so with success. By injecting your own stem cells into the afflicted area (knees ), it stimulates the cartilage to regrow. The doctor my friends have gone to is in TN and has clients from around the country. I'm going to try this myself since I have heard so many sad stories about replacement results.
September 6 at 14:49 EST .

  10 people like this.



   MeiDei  Good luck CW and keep us posted.
September 8 at 20:00 EST .

  9 people like this.





   BirdsNest  Hagar has had the worst time this Summer, really he has felt lousy and achy for a good while. Trip after trip to the doctor, numerous blood workups, finally his doctor said let's do one more workup....Sunday night he had high fever and violent chills. We went to bed at 11pm, early for us, but back up at 3am with cramps and aches. Doc called him Thursday, Lyme disease. He is smack dab in the middle of an acute episode. 30 days of antibiotics. Anyone know of anything else that can be done to help the antibiotic along? So many people around here have had it, there is a specialist in Chincoteague,Va that he will try to get an appt with. I am sure hoping that he can get some relief from the joint pain, he has been fully miserable.
August 23 at 17:30 EST .

   9 people like this.



   MeiDei  As soon as I saw high fever & violent chills I thought Lyme! Oh, I know what he's going through. I was on antibiotics for 2-1/2 months & get tested every year. The aches can last for a long time, some get over it quickly & then there are those of us it recurs; I pray Hagar is of the former group. By all means see a specialist.
August 23 at 18:48 EST .

  9 people like this.



   Wrightwinger  Some folks have trouble tolerating beef after this disease, if I recall correctly. Hope he gets well soon!
August 24 at 14:39 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Balogreene  A tough disease. I never go outside if I don't have to, but, I have friends who suffer from it. One it recurs every few years. I don't know what to do but keep seeing your doctor. Is there nothing on the net, that isn't too out there?
August 26 at 21:53 EST .

  9 people like this.



   BirdsNest  Balo, a friend brought us an article that is in depth about symptoms and treatments, even with herbal supplements. I browsed through it a bit at the "flea market" today. We will make 2 copies, one for us and one for Hagar's doctor. Then return the original to the guy who loaned it to us. Looks to me like the doc has him on too low a dose, he will call Tuesday and ask....maybe even go up there and do a face to face.

There is a nice couple who have been coming to the flea market for several months, she sells items she makes like spinners,breast cancer macrame keychains,para cord bracelets, etc. She uses the money from those to help offset the meds she is on for her form of cancer. She has been through heck and back but got some good news from her cancer doc-cancer free. I got goose bumps. She is the sweetest lady and I hope she can get to where she can go back to work. I have been giving her items like beads, split rings, and keychain snaps for her projects. We don't need them anymore and it will help her profit margin and just because we like the both of them. Her name is Patty and I wish all of you would keep her in your prayers along with everyone here that is going through tough times of any kind. We had a great day but Hagar is wiped out so I shuffled him off for a nap.
August 30 at 18:38 EST .

  17 people like this.



   BirdsNest  This week the pain has been so bad Hagar tried to get to see his doctor but he is out with the flu. So he talked to the nurse, who talked either to the doc or another doc, and what they are telling him is this is good news, it means the antibiotic is working killing the little spirochetes(corkscrews )so it is natural for him to feel worse. He would have appreciated a "heads up" about that part of the treatment. So it is mart carts whenever we go to the grocery store or WalMart because his feet hurt so bad it is painful to walk. All the carts were in use yesterday at WM so a slow and painful trip back to electronics to buy a new keyboard for the computer.
Yesterday the "L" key decided to die. One cannot properly compose an e-mail with out that key!
September 5 at 07:30 EST .

  7 people like this.





   MeiDei  Does anyone know how to tell the difference between Genetically Modified food in the store and that which hasn't been "modified"? Not fresh, but canned, bottled, packaged.
August 19 at 18:58 EST .

   8 people like this.



   Bettijo  Genetically Modified Foods

The best way to avoid genetically modified foods is to know which foods are genetically modified and which foods are not. It helps to understand the difference between heirlooms, hybrids, and GMOs.

With heirlooms, you save the seeds of a fruit or vegetable with favorable characteristics. Other than selecting which plant seeds to save, the seeds are not manipulated.

Hybridization is the act of cross-pollinating two plants; each with a dominant favorable trait resulting in fruit that will bear both of those traits. Seedless watermelons are a good example of a hybrid; they are not a GMO food.
Foods That Are Genetically Modified
Beets, corn, cotton, Hawaiian papaya, soy, rice, canola, alfalfa, yeast (for making wine ), and milk (with RGBH ) are genetically modified foods that have been deemed "fit for human consumption," and are being produced and sold to us.

More than half of the cotton grown in the world is genetically modified. Cottonseed oil is frequently used in food production.

Genetically modified rice has been approved, but it is not yet in large-scale use. GMOs were recently banned in Hawaii, but they excluded papaya from the ban.

Genetically modified wheat has been developed, but not yet approved for consumption. Unfortunately, commercial wheat fields have been contaminated with the genetically modified seed. There is a good possibility that we have been consuming GMO wheat.

Other genetically modified foods that have been deemed fit for human consumption, but are not being sold (or are very hard to find being sold ) at this time (due to consumer and/or farmer demand ) include summer squash, zucchini, tomatoes, and potatoes.

Conventional factory farmed animals are fed genetically modified grains. If you need one more reason to never eat factory farmed meat or eggs, there you have it.

GMO foods for human consumption that are not yet approved include rice, salmon, bananas, apples that don't brown, and a purple tomato may be coming to your local neighborhood supermarket in the near future.
Genetically Modified Foods on our Grocery Store
First and foremost, the easiest way to avoid genetically modified organisms is to eat whole, unprocessed foods that are labeled organic. When organic is not available, know the most likely offenders; these include soy, alfalfa, Hawaiian papaya, and occasionally sweet corn (GMO sweet corn is not yet common in grocery stores ).

When buying packaged foods, such as snack foods, know your GMO ingredients. Without a GMO free guarantee, one should avoid corn, dairy, soy, canola oil, sugar (sugar beets ), and any conventional meat. Conventional, factory farmed livestock are fed genetically modified grains, including GMO foods that aren't even trusted for human consumption.

As far as corn is concerned, it should be noted that popcorn comes from corn that is not genetically modified and sweet corn on the cob is, typically, not genetically modified (but like how genetically modified organisms can contaminate crops, GMO sweet corn may become more common very quickly ).

Also, note that even when you buy organic, in order to completely avoid GMO foods it is imperative to know and
August 21 at 07:05 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Bettijo  trust the company when it comes to soy, alfalfa, wheat, sugar (from sugar beets ), and corn. A reputable producer of food that cares about their customers' health and freedom of choice will test their products regularly (like Eden Foods and Bob's Red Mill ). GMO contamination is a very serious problem, and it's getting harder and harder to grow food without genetically modified seeds sneaking into the crops and taking over.
August 21 at 07:08 EST .

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   Gerty  Would someone review the dangers of GMO to us, once again?

With this extensive list provided by MissBettijo, it would probably put things in perspective.
August 24 at 06:48 EST .

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   Wrightwinger  The genetic modifications are to improve yields, to make them tolerant of some pesticides like roundup and to improve disease tolerance. Sometimes the modifications are pretty weird. Goats have been modified to produce spider silk proteins in their milk to make it easier and cheaper to to make really tough fibers from the stuff. At any rate, many animals prefer to eat non GMO grain, and will bypass GMO foods in preference. There is some merit to the idea that GIGO applies to our food as well as to computer code. (Garbage in, garbage out )
August 24 at 14:47 EST .

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   Balogreene  Thank you WW. Gerty, I love Miss Bettijo, but she doesn't tell us the difference between splicing for favorable characteristics, and GMO. I personally believe her list of GMO contains some foods that are just hybrids done differently.

I agree, can someone please tell me what it is that makes it GMO as opposed to cross-pollination, hybridization, gene splicing, etc.
August 26 at 21:58 EST .

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   Wrightwinger  There are several folks in my family that don't tolerate glutin in bread. We have found a type of bread mix that makes my mom very happy called Pamela's bread. My wife makes it for her in a bread machine and I slice it for her. It looks, smells and tastes pretty good. Here is the website for it, along for other glutin free products.
http://www.pamelasproducts.com/products/baking-mixes/pamelas
-gluten-free-bread-mix/
August 17 at 16:32 EST .

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   Balogreene  I must just be in a bad mood.
If I was gluten intolerant, I would go to a doctor quickly. Supposedly the only people who can not eat gluten, have celiac's disease, which is very serious. If you don't have celiac's, you are not gluten intolerant, but there is something else wrong with your gut, like maybe diverticulosis (or osis, depending ).
Or a friend of mine had an appointment to see about celiac's cause of her reaction to grains turns out she had bowel cancer (a very slow growing, nothing to worry about, but must be fixed type of cancer ).
Gluten is the thing in wheats that makes good bread. I have to admit, I have a ton of gluten-free recipes, cause I don't need the carbs or other side-effects. But, according to scientists, allergists, nutritionists, etc. only about .01% of people have a true gluten intolerance.
August 26 at 22:06 EST .

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   Wrightwinger  You know, Balogreen, you may be spot on about the gluten intolerance ratio. I haven't made an exhaustive study about it. But there may well be some other factor involved. The wheat we buy now is not the wheat sold when we were kids. There are a variety of different strains of wheat, and these have been selectively bred for certain characteristics. Along the way, with depleted soil, and sprays, and chemical fertilizers, and even some gene splicing, I fear that some of the nutrition is lost, and some other things have been added. The thing about much of this gluten free bread is that it is made of a variety of other flours such as rice and sorghum. Add in the manufacturing process of wheat, where much of the nutrition is stripped away to make stable products with long shelf-lives, and even though some of the vitamins have been added back, some of the food value is lost.
September 1 at 09:18 EST .

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   Balogreene  WW, I never thought of it that way. It is not a gluten intolerance so much as an intolerance to everything else we've done to make our food "healthier", and last longer.
September 7 at 20:29 EST .

  8 people like this.



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