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The Road
Automobilia




   Safetydude  What we always knew.
From the U of Minnesota, no less.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_SCI_CLIMATE_FUEL_E
FFECTS?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
December 15 at 21:54 EST .

   15 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  Good article S'dude.
December 16 at 16:22 EST .

  7 people like this.





   Iacta alea est  My Dad's very first brand-new-from-the-dealer vehicle was a '64 GMC Series 4000, which he took delivery on Christmas Eve 1963. Pictured is a '62, but his '64 was almost identical, but with a van type body, yet set up as a dump truck.
   November 27 at 22:27 EST .

   15 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  This is fun Buzz, thanks for the heads-up on where to find these pics.
November 27 at 22:28 EST .

  10 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  I wondered why you would set up a van with a dump body, then I read again what was being hauled.
November 30 at 14:55 EST .

  8 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  The interior of the van body (walls & floor ) was all sheathed in buffed aluminum so that the sawdust/shavings would slide off easily and not get "hung-up" on the studs and ribs that formed the body's structure. And since the mills & cabinet factories collect the material in dust collection systems which blew the stuff into overhead hoppers, the truck loaded from the top.
December 1 at 21:33 EST .

  13 people like this.





   Iacta alea est  Except for the paint scheme Dad's Brigadier looked just like this. The only thing I didn't like about it was the front "clip" was fiberglass
   November 27 at 00:04 EST .

   15 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  Dad's was an '81 and is still running today.
November 27 at 00:05 EST .

  11 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  My oldest brother worked in the trucking industry for many years (he was fleet maintenance manager for a company that had about 100 tractors and 500 trailers ). As fuel costs were climbing, the accountants told him to come up with ways to reduce the empty weight of the trucks in order to increase available payload. Their primary commodity was drywall carried on flatbed trailers. He custom built a tractor/trailer combination using as much fiberglass and aluminum as possible. The result was four tons lighter than the standard combination they were using at the time. Unfortunately, no truck or trailer manufacturer took any interest in building them in quantity.
November 30 at 14:53 EST .

  10 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  Sounds like a great idea, and profitable too. I am always amazed the way some great ideas get left on the "drawing board". Some smart folks at Harvard's business school gave Fred Smith a "C-" on a paper that outlined/described what became FedEx. The professor told Smith it could never work.
November 30 at 21:10 EST .

  10 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  It probably would have been profitable had they been able to re-equip the fleet, but one truck didn't make that much difference. They proved the concept, but couldn't find any partners.
November 30 at 22:38 EST .

  10 people like this.





   Iacta alea est  A friendly competitor of my Dad's had three of these in his "fleet" at one time. 1955 White cabovers.
   November 23 at 16:17 EST .

   20 people like this.



   Iacta alea est  This not their truck BTW. My Dad sold sawdust & shavings.
November 23 at 16:18 EST .

  14 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  White started building the model 3000 in 1949. My dad considered getting one at one time, but drivers of grain trucks are in and out of the cab so much that he decided against a "two story".
November 23 at 16:24 EST .

  13 people like this.





   Ole buzzard  Speaking of cabovers, for a time during the late 1950s/early 1960s, Mack offered a line of medium duty cabovers built with Mack frames and power trains, but utilizing Ford cabs. Here is an example of each.
   November 23 at 13:27 EST .

   17 people like this.




   Iacta alea est  Of all the GMC's my Dad owned my favorites were the two tilt-cab models ('71 & '75 )
   November 22 at 18:20 EST .

   18 people like this.




   Ole buzzard  He also had an Ottawa Model C corn sheller mounted on a 1947 International KB-7 truck.
   November 21 at 17:38 EST .

   19 people like this.




   Ole buzzard  And the Studebaker (dad's was almost identical to this one ).
   November 21 at 17:34 EST .

   16 people like this.



   Ole buzzard  I have not been able to find a picture of one yet, but shortly before filing for bankruptcy, Studebaker built a series of trucks using Mack B-model cabs.
November 28 at 12:11 EST .

  14 people like this.





   Ole buzzard  This is a 1947 KB-6 (a 1949 model is identical )
   November 21 at 17:32 EST .

   19 people like this.




   Ole buzzard  Back when my father had his feed and grain business, he had a pretty varied fleet of trucks that were used for hauling grain. There was a 1948 White WC22 similar to the one below, except it was slightly longer with a tag (unpowered ) axle behind the powered one, a 1949 International KB-6, and a Studebaker (I don't remember the model ).
   November 21 at 17:25 EST .

   16 people like this.


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