TheConnection Walls
29 walls

     Main Page
The Lobby
     Blessings
     Coffee Klatch
     Comments
Suggestions
     Computers
&Tech Issues
     Crafts
     Dogs, Cats
& Critters
     Events
     Faith
     Gardening &
Landscaping
     Health & Diet
     Household Hints
     Jokes
     Movies & Reviews
     Music
     Nostalgia
     Pet Peeves
     Photography
     Politics
     The Range
2nd Amendment
     Recipes
     The Road
Automobilia
     Shopper's Beware
Caveat Emptor
     Sports
   Suggested Reading
   
    Reload Wall
    Admin Photos
    Members Photos

    Login
 

     Suggested Viewing/Listening
     Travel
     Veterans' Page
& Militaria
     Weird
But True

Members Photos
3 out of 10
see all

   

   

   






Suggested Reading



   StormCnter  I have commented before that I am usually skeptical about new books written by really prolific authors, thinking no writer has that many good books in him or her. Stephen King and Larry McMurtry occasionally turn out a gem, but beware. My exception is C.J. Box. I always pick up his books as they come out and I am never disappointed, although some are more memorable than others. His Joe Pickett series is very entertaining (Pickett is a Wyoming Game Warden ), but Box has written stand-alone fiction, too. I particularly remember "Three Weeks to Say Goodbye" about an adoptive couple who get a devastating phone call from the adoption agency nine months after they brought their baby home. It's a nail-biter and a Kleenex shredder. Check out C. J. Box's books.
http://cjboxbooklist.com/c-j-box-books-in-order/
9 hours ago .



   Gram77  Interesting. Whenever I am either at the book store or the library, I admit that I walk by this author. Thanks to you I believe this author bears checking into. Thanks!
9 hours ago .




   Gram77  Has anyone read Paper Lion by George Plimpton? I recently read a good review. If it's in the library I might take a crack at it.
March 25 at 16:42 EST .



   StormCnter  Gram I read it when it came out. How many zillion years ago was that? But George Plimpton is always entertaining.
Monday at 12:49 EST .


   MeiDei  We'd occasionally see him on one of the piers in Newport, RI many years ago - he could be a character study.
14 hours ago .




   Gram77  Just finished The Killing of the Rising Sun. The only one of O'Reilly's books for me. I'm sure many readers here at The Connection have read his books. Personally, I liked this book and found many details that at the time were never reported. The one thing I did not know what how long it was before Japan finally communicated with Truman before accepting the unconditional surrender.
March 25 at 07:32 EST .



   StormCnter  I read one of O'Reilly's memoirs. I'm glad you liked one of his historical books, I might give it a try. I hated his memoir. I had it on audiobook and I was so peeved I stopped at a roadside park and tossed the whole audiobook in a litter-can.
March 25 at 09:09 EST .


   Gram77  Had to laugh at this but I can relate. Once in a while I will get a book that I have waited to get my hands on and get nothing but disappointment. About The Killing of the Rising Sun; the book is of course history and facts but I thought it was written like a novel and fond it a page turner.
March 25 at 16:36 EST .


   MeiDei  A rather exotic Eng. teacher we newly teenagers had (her Jewish State military/spy boyfriend complete w/eye patch ala Moishe Dayan ) taught us that having a bad book to read wasn't a waste - it helped identify & appreciate a good book.
Monday at 01:32 EST .




   StormCnter  Anyone read any of Peter Swanson's books? He has written "The Girl With a Clock for a Heart", "the Kind Worth Killing" and "Her Every Fear". I read "...Fear" and enjoyed it, so I picked up an inexpensive paperback version of "The Kind..." and I just finished it. Well. Talk about a double cross and a triple cross and twists and turns to puzzle even the most avid of us crime thriller solvers. I see a reviewer said this book should be an Alfred Hitchcock movie. It was a good one and I recommend it. Here's the GoodReads review:
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/21936809-the-kind-worth-
killing?from_search=true
March 20 at 16:45 EST .

   1 person like this.



   Jerico  Just went and requested it from my library. Can't wait.
March 22 at 05:04 EST .

 1 person like this.



   StormCnter  I hope you enjoy it.
March 22 at 07:55 EST .

 1 person like this.





   StormCnter  I just turned the last page on a book that puzzled me. How much are we influenced by book reviews? Reviewers say the book is "haunting", "the prose is lyrical", the story is "shattering", so I expect most of those things. I can tell you that "Idaho" is all of them. Amazon says "A stunning debut novel about love and forgiveness, about the violence of memory and the equal violence of its loss—from O. Henry Prize–winning author Emily Ruskovich". One reviewer said this book will turn upside-down everything you thought you knew about life. A woman inexplicably and suddenly kills her six-year-old. Her 9 year old daughter sees and flees. Her husband divorces her and spends years grieving and wondering while fighting the onset of his inherited dementia. His new wife is trying to deal with all of this and to find some answers. I finished the book wishing more ends had been tied up, but understanding that in real life that seldom happens. I am curious to know if anyone else has read "Idaho".
March 16 at 12:53 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Gram77  Just checked the review by Amazon. I think this book is worth checking out but from the library. I've backed off on how many books I purchase. I could buy a car given what I've spent over the years. I thank my mother for the love of books. She read to me constantly as a child.
March 16 at 16:57 EST .

  2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Me, too, Gram. However, books still have value after we've read them and so I like to think the investment is shared. The problem with buying versus borrowing (library, friends ) is that we're stuck with what we paid for but not so with what was shared with us.
March 17 at 05:53 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Jerico  I love the library. I have Lisa Jackson's latest EXPECTING TO DIE that I just started and just picked up Joel C Rosenberg's WITHOUT WARNING. Such a gift.
March 20 at 14:27 EST .

 1 person like this.



   MeiDei  Rosenberg is a gifted writer, within the first few pages I've been tackled, picked up & carried along for the ride; thanks for mentioning him.
March 21 at 21:58 EST .

 1 person like this.





   Gram77  A short time ago I mentioned several books I was considering, one being Dark Town. I started it yesterday and I can't tell you the things I remember as a kid growing up in the 30s. For me it is tough reading, however, quite accurate to the times as I remember it. One of the avid readers had said they had read it and darned if I can remember who it was or how they viewed the book.
March 14 at 15:15 EST .

   2 people like this.



   StormCnter  Gram, the avid reader was probably me. I read it and it's not a book anyone can say was enjoyable. It's not that kind of light reading, but it was very readable and I found it engrossing.
March 16 at 12:44 EST .

 1 person like this.





   StormCnter  I'm reading "The Highest Tide" by Jim Lynch. It was published in 2006 and I ordered it in my latest batch of books. Almost as soon as I began reading, I realized I had read it when it came out, but I'm enjoying a second time through this little paperback. It's a quick read and a little different. I recommend it. A shy, nerdy, underdeveloped thirteen year old boy makes some odd discoveries during his nighttime strolls along the Puget Sound mud flats. Here's the GoodReads review. http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/94673.The_Highest_Tide
March 12 at 06:30 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Gram77  Headed for the library this morning. Hopefully they will have a copy.
March 13 at 09:35 EST .

  2 people like this.





   ALynnMcW  Picked up a book today by J. D. Vance. "Hillbilly Elegy" attempts to explain the anger that elected Trump. I can hardly put it down. I don't know if it's true but these are my people and I understand what he is saying.
March 11 at 18:24 EST .

   3 people like this.



   StormCnter  I'll be interested in your review, ALynn. I've read a lot about this book, but hesitated about buying it because I'm afraid it'll be a grand slam against rural people and our culture.
March 12 at 06:26 EST .

  3 people like this.





   StormCnter  Ok, here's a tout for a frivolous little book that I have enjoyed. It's a real change from the crime thrillers, WWII memoirs and violent western-themed books that are on my usual menu. This one is "Alligators, Old Mink and New Money: One Woman's Adventures in Vintage Clothing", a sort of biography of one woman's journey through high-fashion modeling in NYC, Hamburg and Paris and on to opening a vintage clothing store in Brooklyn after she got too old for the good modeling jobs. I'm not into vintage clothing, so this was new to me, but it's been a fun read. If you need something lighter than usual, but still interesting, give it a try.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/147066.Alligators_Old_Min
k_and_New_Money
March 3 at 11:18 EST .

   2 people like this.



   MeiDei  I have some articles of attire that are older than my son, i.e., a beautiful gold re-embroided brocade cocktail evening dress with matching hand made [Belgium] high heels. and a silk Peau de Soie emerald green & white ball gown w/matching coat both from the early 60's [do they count?]they both hold many good memories & don't take up much space. This book interests me muchly - thanks!
March 3 at 17:40 EST .

  2 people like this.



   Gram77  Oh my goodness, Peau de Soie?? Is that still used in the clothing designer world today?
March 6 at 17:26 EST .

  2 people like this.



   MeiDei  I doubt it Gram but I'm the last person to ask. It may be due for a comeback; Ivanka wore a black sequined floor length (? ) skirt recently that garnered a lot of good/bad attention, sequined blouses/sweaters were popular 50 years ago.
March 8 at 10:28 EST .

  2 people like this.





   MeiDei  The Random House on-line book club just previewed this week "We Were the Lucky Ones" a narrative based on the author's Jewish family in Poland & the German invasion. http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30267929-we-were-the-luck
y-ones


Coincidentally, for the past month I've been reading a 600+ page novel of the same era and locale titled "The Emperor of Lies" also based on survivors interviews, letters, diaries & archival reports of actual life in a ghetto, it's workings, and deprivation, hierarchy, & contribution to the war effort. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/04/books/review/the-emperor-o
f-lies-by-steve-sem-sandberg-book-review.html

Do I recommend either for your pleasure (? ) not unless you think your life sucks and you need a reminder there's always someone, somewhere worse off than you. I didn't like 'Lies" in the beginning but eventually was drawn in, yet thankfully only insofar as a peeping Tom; it's a book you can read but not participate in or associate with any of the characters. 3/4's read, Oy! I had no idea that these ghettos were more like slave factories over the course of several years [as long as they were productive & met Hitler's war needs] instead of short term holding places before shipping them all off to concentration camps & extermination, however, those too old, disabled or under 10 were on very borrowed time. In short: an eye opener.
February 24 at 03:53 EST .

   2 people like this.



   Gram77  Another book I MUST read. When history and the world was changing I was quite young but I sensed that when I listened to adults talking during the late 30s I just knew I was hearing both fear and anger. Now that I am well up in years I read a great number of non-fiction books about those times. It's difficult to imagine the cruelty that existed in the world. And, I worry about today's world. Wonder who eventually will be reading those books about this present world.
February 25 at 16:55 EST .

  2 people like this.



     Next Page